Our Top 3 Vehicle Evolutions in Hollywood Reboots and Remakes

Whenever Hollywood experiences a box-office hit, a sequel is almost inevitable. As fun as it is to see our favorite characters change and mature, it’s almost equally as exciting to see their iconic vehicles grow up. From then-and-now Camaros in Michael Bay’s “Transformers” to the evolution of the Mitsubishi Lancer, erm, Evolution within the “Fast and Furious” franchise, these are three of our favorites.

Chevrolet Camaro: “Transformers”

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Source | DreamWorks

When a live-action version of “Transformers” hit big screens in 2007 (there was also an animated feature in 1986), the iconic Bumblebee took a couple of vehicular forms. However, it’s most remembered for turning into a fifth-generation Chevrolet Camaro—of sorts. The car we saw was actually a concept unveiled in 2006.

For the film, Chevy placed body panels made from molds used for the concept on the chassis of a Holden Monaro. It was a precursor to the Gen 5 Camaro (topped by an SS trim boasting an LS3 6.2-liter V8 with 426 horsepower), which was only sold two years later.

A yellow 2017 Chevrolet Camaro

The sixth-generation Camaro, the basis for Bumblebee’s transformation in the upcoming “Transformers.” Source | Courtesy of Chevrolet

Fast-forward to summer 2017 and installment five of the series, “Transformers: The Last Knight.” In this chapter, Bumblebee will take on yet another form, this time a sixth-gen Camaro wearing some exterior aero modifications, including a more aggressive front fascia, hood cooling vents, and large spoilers all around. A trio of engines are available for the platform—which was revealed a year and a half ago—most interesting of which is the LT1 V8 churning out an impressive 455 horsepower.

Ford Mustang: “Gone in 60 Seconds”

Younger viewers who watched the 2000 version of “Gone in 60 Seconds,” starring Nicolas Cage, may not realize it was actually a loose remake of an identically titled 1974 release. Sharing more than just a name, the main automobile in both iterations was a classic Ford Mustang. The original featured a 1971 Mustang partially modified to look like an optioned-out 1973 using a newer grille, as well as black accenting on the hood and lower paneling reminiscent of the Mach 1 special edition.

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Source | Touchstone Pictures

In the reboot, the creative team decided to go with a slightly older pony car: a 1967 Mustang fastback, gussied up to resemble a Shelby GT500. A total of 12 ‘Stangs were sourced, and all were built for various purposes such as chase scenes and stunts. The vehicles were truly a hodgepodge of parts, utilizing aftermarket PIAA auxiliary lighting, Chevy Astro van billet grille components, 17-inch Schmidt wheels designed after Ford GT40 units, Lincoln Versailles rear ends, and a plethora of custom-fabricated fiberglass pieces.

Of the 12 Eleanors, only seven survived after shooting wrapped up, according to Mustang Monthly. It breaks our hearts that even a single one was damaged.

Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution: “The Fast and the Furious”

Arguably Mitsubishi Motor’s biggest fan-favorite product, the Lancer Evo, is prominently featured in two of the biggest underdog F&F follow-ups: “2 Fast 2 Furious” and “The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift.” The former is where we get the first sighting, when the feds give Paul Walker’s character a tracking-device-equipped 2002 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution VII to drive to an undercover drug cartel meeting. It’s the scene that made us love the Evo.

The all-wheel drive sedan had a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder mill, equipped with nitrous tanks, of course (hey, it was the early 2000s), and sported a Japanese-spec DAMD body kit, ARC trunk wing, and Motegi Racing alloys.

In the third F&F movie, the race-ready Lancer skipped a generation and returned as a 2006 Evo IX GSR, given to protagonist Sean Boswell after he totals his mentor Han’s Nissan Silvia while learning how to drift around corners. Like the VII, the IX employs a boosted 2.0-liter powerplant that in stock form makes 276 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque, here benefiting from the addition of a Rhys Millen Racing air intake and exhaust downpipe. Aesthetically, it was fitted with an Alabama-based APR Performance body kit, spoiler and side mirrors, along with massive 19-inch RAYS G-Games rims. It looked—and was—fast.

There are too many reboots and remakes with great vehicles, and we’re guessing we missed some of your favorites. Share your picks in the comments.

Comments

  1. Oliver Blake says:

    Wonderful pictures and videos..

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