People and Their Cars video

Car videoHere at the DIY Garage, we revel in finding and sharing cool car content. Check out this informative video that showcases some telling stats on America’s enduring love for its automobiles.

 

Check it out:

 

According to CJ Pony Parts, who created the video:

The average American driver spends 600 hours per year behind the wheel. That’s a significant chunk of our lives – in total, we’ll spend 5 years driving in our lifetimes – and it has caused many of us to grow emotionally attached to these vehicles. Cars do more than just get us from point A to point B; they get us there safely, sometimes in style, and we get to know all of their little quirks and features.

Because of this, a quarter of us name our cars, and even if we don’t actually attach a name to the vehicle we drive, 40% of us attach a personality to it. We even assign our cars a gender – 32% of the cars on the road are “female,” while 16% are “male.”

Maybe this affection towards the vehicles we drive explains why we spend so much money on them. We spend, on average, 14.5% of our income on car parts and service, and that doesn’t include the $1560 we spend per year on fuel. Still, for a means of transportation that will take us 798,000 miles over the course of a lifetime.

DVD review: car racing documentary Weekend of a Champion

Car FilmThe lost Roman Polanski classic finds a whole new audience.

It’s tempting to give Roman Polanski all the credit for the utterly engrossing release of Weekend of a Champion, a new re-cut version of his 1972 film chronicling Formula One legend Jackie Stewart’s victory at the 1971 Monaco Grand Prix. But there’s more at work here than just a great director’s hand.

The dark, grainy picture quality — par for the course at the time — imbues every scene with the gravity of nostalgia, even when Stewart is simply explaining the art of high-speed cornering over breakfast in his hotel room, clad only in a pair of briefs. That’s an advantage Polanski’s film didn’t have when it debuted at the 1972 Berlin Film Festival. Incidentally, it’s also why we are all kicking ourselves for not having thought of Instagram.

Still, there are undoubtedly strokes of artistic genius in this Weekend of a Champion, out this week on DVD with its touching new epilogue in which the now-seventysomething director and subject, friends for most of their lives, offer their reflections.

One is the way in which Polanski, a motorsports enthusiast who lacks expert knowledge, inserts himself into the narrative. As Stewart talks about car control while clad only in his underwear, it’s Polanski himself who’s across the breakfast table, standing in for the audience as a sponge for Stewart’s vast insight. Earlier, the two men park themselves at a curbside location on the iconic Monaco circuit, watching other racers take practice laps while Stewart informs a rapt Polanski what they should be doing, and where they’re coming up short.

Polanski is the perfect foil for his chatty and endearingly at-ease friend, at once naive about the finer points of racing and immensely wise about what it takes to tell a good story. Had he shot the film as a traditional documentary, remaining behind the camera at all times, it would have been a considerably less engaging affair.

Another Polanski signature is his artist’s eye for detail. For instance, as Stewart sits in his car in pit lane, preparing to go out for a practice lap, the camera lingers on the driver’s feet while he works the three pedals like a surgeon with his tools — clutch in, clutch out, now right toe on the brake, heel on the gas, left foot clutching simultaneously. This is a technique known as “heel-and-toe downshifting,” and it’s a lost art today now that automatic transmissions rule the Formula One roost. But in the moment, Polanski knew enough to know that this little dress-rehearsal highlighted a crucial element of championship racing. Without it, one loses precious time in each corner; it was one of many highly refined skills that a racecar driver in 1971 had to master in order to stand a chance.Car Film 2

Most filmmakers would have focused on Stewart himself, or perhaps his pit crew as they prepared the car, but Polanski knew there was more taking place in front of him that mattered. And he found it. Beyond its instant credibility as the work of a legendary director, Weekend of a Champion makes for surprisingly modern entertainment. With its hand-held camerawork and ad hoc exchanges, the film comes across as a precursor of sorts to reality TV. But unlike that fundamentally contrived medium, Champion provides a fascinating window into a long-lost era of relative authenticity, one in which world-class athletes weren’t yet separated from us by layers of management and years of coddling.

Jackie Stewart was doubtless a global superstar, but in Polanski’s portrayal, at least, he is also eminently likeable and down-to-earth, a humble Scottish chap with the wry perspective of someone who knows how blessed he is to be here. We, too, are blessed for being exposed to this work more than 40 years after the fact.

The early ’70s may have been “very trendy,” as the two men agree in the epilogue, but here they also serve as an interesting counterpoint to the cynicism that dominates our age. There’s something to be said for approaching the world with a sense of wonderment and possibility; with Polanski and Stewart as messengers, one can’t help but watch and listen closely.

Weekend of a Champion is available on DVD and Blu-ray courtesy of MPI Media.

Check out a clip:

It’s coming…Google’s driverless car

Google driverless car

Photo credit: John Green

If you’re a Sci-fi fan, the concept of the driverless car is nothing new. But, seeing it actually happen in real-time is a completely different thing.

It turns out that Google’s driverless vehicles have now logged close to 700,000 miles in autonomous driving. That’s nothing to sneeze at, and has probably saved the company at least a few thousand dollars in coffee and caffeine pills alone. But there are many other potential benefits to be had.

Mercury News reporter Gary Richards had this to say about his recent test drive:

“Google’s grand experiment picked me up at home in West San Jose and ferried me to the Computer History Museum in Mountain View. Later other cars took me and numerous other media types on a 25-minute tour of city streets.

There were two Google workers along for each trip, but for the most part, there were no hands on the steering wheel.

Got that? No hands. The car made a few abrupt moves into left-turn lanes. And once it shuddered at another turn when a nearby bus seemed to confuse the onboard computers.”

Safety is a primary concern and selling point of the vehicles. “We actually haven’t had any at-fault accidents while the car is in self-driving mode,” said Google spokeswoman Katelin Jabbari. “The only at-fault accident was caused while a driver was in control.”

To tackle that, Google has packed these vehicles with $150K in specialized equipment, which includes a radar system with a price tag of $70K alone. All these gadgets enable the car to generate a 3-D map of its surroundings and can detect other vehicles, pedestrians and other things that lay in its path.

Per that, we still don’t know how much these cars are going to cost, but one can imagine. Stay tuned for more on that aspect.

For now, check out Gary Richards’ full review.

 

 

The Cost of Car Ownership Declines, says AAA

Car ownershipIt’s music to our ears over here at Advance HQ.

But is it true that owning and operating your car has gotten cheaper? So says a new AAA study.

 AAA released the results of its annual Your Driving Costs study today, revealing a 2.7 percent decrease in the cost to own and operate a sedan in the U.S. The average cost fell 1.64 cents to 59.2 cents per mile, or $8,876 per year, based upon 15,000 miles of annual driving.

“Despite increases in maintenance and registration fees, American motorists are experiencing an overall decrease in the cost to own and operate a vehicle,” said John Nielsen, AAA Managing Director of Automotive Engineering and Repair. “A large decrease in fuel costs, [plus] lower tire, insurance and depreciation expenses are saving owners more than one and a half cents on every mile they drive.”

Here at AAP HQ, we wondered about the fuel costs part of it…do they really seem lower? It turns out that while gas prices haven’t actually tanked, overall they are less than they were in last year’s study, says AAA. Per that, we’ll take what we can get.

The study covers aspects such as fuel, maintenance, tires, insurance and more. You can read more about the study and download the 2014 Your Driving Costs brochure, courtesy of AAA.

And, don’t miss out on great tips for saving gas that you can easily put in place before hitting the road this summer.

 

Car news from around the web: Quirky Futuristic Cars

Euronews offers up a video of some of the wildest car designs found at the Geneva Motor Show 2014:

In just 2:31, you’ll see:

  • Wazuma GT, a motorbike/car/Batmobile mixture with a “Jaguar 4.0 litre supercharged V8 engine [that] achieves 375 horsepower and 387 pound-feet of torque.”
  • Fleche Rouge (Red Arrow), a car designed like an airplane; “700 kilograms of this red racer runs on a 4 cylinder 1.6 litre engine,” the same as the Citroen DS3.
  • Toyota’s FV2, where drivers lean forward to move the vehicle forward, lean back to reverse and steer by moving the vehicle side by side. If car color matters to you, check out another unique feature.
  • Nissan’s Black Glider, inspired by the ZEOD RC Le Mans racer, gives out zero emissions from twin on-board motors.
  • Volkswagen’s XL1, the most fuel efficient car on the planet at 313 miles per gallon, produces only 24g/km of CO2 emissions, which Volkswagen touts as a new benchmark.
  • Mansory’s car modification that boasts 0-to-100 in 4.4 seconds.

How to flip cars real good

If you’re a fan of car chase movies, you’ll want to read Car and Driver’s The Inside Story of the Academy Award–Winning Car Inversion Device, Or: How to Flip Cars Real Good. The article shares how 11-time Oscar nominee and one-time winner John Frazier practices the “mad science of movie mayhem” in an area that’s “filled with pick-a-part junkyards, ticky-tack indoor swap meets, and manufacturing businesses better off being ignored by OSHA.”

Frazier pneumatically flips cars up to 20 feet in altitude with “as much acrobatic spectacle as possible without necessarily modifying the car.” He has about two dozen car flippers that he rents out for $200 a day (one week minimum), not counting the cost of union labor required to operate the devices.

Transformation of cool cars

If you’re a fan of any of these movies, shows or cars:

  • Back to the Future’s Delorean
  • ·       Ghostbuster’s Ecto-1
  • ·       Herbie
  • ·       Scooby Doo’s Mystery Machine
  • ·       The Partridge Family bus
  • ·       Ninja Mutant Turtle’s Party Wagon

then be sure to check out how Canadian illustrator Darren Rawlings turns these pop culture icons into Transformer Autobots in Mashable’s If Pop Culture’s Coolest Cars Were ‘Transformers.’

Good luck with THAT

No matter how many contests exist, there’s always room for another good one. Here, site visitors got to vote on the greatest road sign of all-time. The first place winner, one that shows a convoluted, virtually impossible-to-understand roadway graphic with the words “Good Luck” written below, received 30% of the votes (fourth photo if you scroll down).

The second place winner received almost 20% of the votes: Left Turn Under the Following 26 Conditions (tenth photo), and the third place winner, “No Outlet,” received 17% of the votes (first photo).

They’re all worth a look. Each winner received no prize “other than the obvious bragging rights associated with finding the most mind-boggling sign known to man … or at least out of the signs found this time around.”

Horseless e-Carriage coming to the Big Apple

For more than 100 years, couples visiting New York City have enjoyed romantic rides in a horse and carriage–but that may be coming to an end because of congestion issues and concerns about the horses. If so, the replacement may be an electric carriage with old-fashioned styling.

This vehicle seats eight and can reach 30 miles per hour, traveling about 100 miles before needing recharged.

What’s the quirkiest or weirdest car you’ve ever driven or seen? Let us know!

Editor’s note: Whether your ride’s from a salvage yard or a Sci-Fi flick, Advance Auto Parts has you covered, with a wide range of quality auto parts, tools and accessories. Buy online, pick up in store.

Going to Extremes: Cars From All Over the Spectrum

Lamborghini Veneno. Photo credit: Automobili Lamborghini.

Lamborghini Veneno. Photo credit: Automobili Lamborghini.

As human beings, we all love to noodle over what’s the biggest, what’s the highest, what’s the fastest, what’s the most expensive. That urge is what has kept the Guinness Book of World Records in business for nearly sixty years to date. Per that, we decided to pull together a few lists of extreme cars. Read on to see what we found…

Most expensive cars in the world

For this info, we turned to DigitalTrends.com’s article, Dream wheels: The top ten most expensive cars in the world (March 2014). The good news is that, if you can spare $845,000, then you can own the cheapest car on this list: the Porsche 918 Spyder. This hybrid boasts 887 horsepower, enough to go 0-60 in 2.8 seconds. “For comparison,” the article reads, “that’s faster than the money you’ll have to plunk down for this thing can leave your bank account.”

At the top of this list is the Lamborghini Veneno at $4 million – but, even if you had that kind of dough, all three cars have already been sold. If you can scrounge together another 500k, though, you still have a shot at one of the nine roadsters. Digital Trends calls the Lamborghini Veneno “simply jaw-dropping,” also with 0-60 capabilities, which is “probably faster than sound can leave your body during a terrified scream.”

Ten cheapest cars

Assuming that not everyone will have the $845,000 needed for the Porsche, we decided to include Jalopnik.com’s list of The Ten Cheapest Cars Ever Sold. The cheapest car available in the United States right now (says this December 2013 article) is the Nissan Versa at $12,780.

There are cheaper cars in this list, but these prices correspond to the release dates of the vehicles so:

  • Yes, a 2007 KIA would have been free – but the catch was that you needed to buy a 2008 KIA at the same time.
  • And, yes. A Ford Model T was a great bargain at $3,895 in 1923 but. That was more than 90 years ago.
  • Even cheaper than a Model T was the Banner Boy Buckboard at $3,152 – but that photo kind of reminds me of my Big Wheel.

 

Rolls Royce 2013. Photo credit: Rolls-Royce Motor Cars Limited.

Rolls Royce 2013. Photo credit: Rolls-Royce Motor Cars Limited.

Big daddies

The “car guys” at Zeroto60Times.com who write for “car guys” decided to define the largest cars as the longest, listing the top 50 in production today (2014 cars in the list). Is it any surprise that the top three are all Rolls?

  • 2013 Rolls-Royce Phantom Extended Wheelbase: 239.8 inches
  • 2013 Rolls-Royce Phantom Sedan: 230 inches
  • 2013 Rolls-Royce Phantom Drophead Coupe: 220.9 inches

Those cars, though, don’t hold a candle to the 1959 Cadillac Fleetwood 75 sedan at the astonishing length of 244.8 inches and the 2005 Maybach Exelro Coup at 245.3 inches.

Little dudes

As all good videos should, this one needs no introduction and is worth every minute.

Debate about the world’s fastest car

Autosaur.com has published what they call Fastest Car in The World: The ultimate guide (April 2014), where they examine claims of speed and provide their perspectives. They also clarify that, when talking about the fastest car in the world, they are meaning the fastest production car in the world. Otherwise, the Thrust SSC, a “jet-propelled car-rocket which broke the speed of sound and reached 763 mph (1,228 km/hr)” would have set the record on October 15, 1997.

As an aside, this article is worth reading for the photos alone.

Tortoise, not the hare

In The Ten Slowest Cars That You Can Buy (October 2013), Jalopnik determines the slowest car by the time it takes to go 0-60 – and the slowest car is also, not surprisingly, the smallest car: the Peel P50. That’s because it goes to 60 mph . . . um, well, never. It tends to top out at about 35 mph.

In fact, you have to go to the fourth slowest car to find one that can go 60 mph – and that’s its maximum speed: the MIA Electric Car.

Oddballs

This post wouldn’t be complete without a look at some of the world’s strangest vehicles – and, for that, we turn to DarkRoastedBlend.com. Although written in 2007, this is an in-depth look at some very peculiar looking vehicles, complete with excellent photos and offbeat commentary:

• Part 1: The World’s Strangest Vehicles
• Part 2: The World’s Strangest Vehicles
• Part 3: The World’s Strangest Vehicles
• Part 4: The World’s Strangest Vehicles

 

Editor’s note: What are the most extreme vehicles you’ve seen or driven? Let us know here.

Oh, the horror…the story of monster trucks!

Shotgun Harry. Photo credit: International Monster Truck Museum.

Shotgun Harry. Photo credit: International Monster Truck Museum.

“A monster truck is fascinating because it can go anywhere—and over anything in its path. Here are trucks that typically weigh 10,000 pounds or more, jumping 25 to 30 feet in the air and performing long jumps upwards of 200 feet. This defies expectations, gravity, and the laws of physics.” (Jeff Cook, President and Founder of the International Monster Truck Museum & Hall of Fame)

If you’re a diehard fan, then names Allen Pezo, Dan Patrick, Scott Stephens, Gary Porter and Army Armstrong may ring a bell, especially as each was inducted into the International Monster Truck Museum’s Hall of Fame on November 9, 2013–during its third annual induction ceremony. Pezo had the most votes, while Stephens and Porter tied for second.

The International Monster Truck Museum (IMTM) & Hall of Fame was created in 2010 with the “mission of collecting and archiving the history of the monster truck sport and related aspects of the high performance aftermarket, focusing upon capturing history from the surviving pioneers and legends.” Each year, the IMTM will also honor accomplished people who contribute significantly to monster trucks by inducting them into the hall of fame.

This museum is different from many others in that, although it does house early versions of monster trucks, it is also recording “history” as it happens, archiving photos and data of modern trucks – rather than waiting 25 years and then seeking out the information. Here’s the breakdown:

Typically, there are three to four classic monster trucks on display at any given time in the museum, along with memorabilia and other historical items. Meanwhile, the website contains excellent resources, including a monster database of vehicles and relevant info surrounding each vehicle; here are three examples:

• Aaron’s All-American Dream Machine, a vehicle that set a world speed record of 96.80 mph in March 2012

• King Kong, belonging to Jeff Dane, one of the sport’s early celebrities

• Bob Chandler’s Bigfoot, the original car crusher

The site also includes driver profiles and loads of photos.

How it all got started

“Really,” Jeff Cook says, “one thing just led to another. There is a large museum complex in Auburn, including the National Military History Center, and the founder is a friend of mine. I was visiting him one day when he asked me if there was a museum yet for monster trucks and I said ‘no.’ We weren’t sure if we could pull one off but we got together with others in the industry and we were successful.”

“We have some early trucks in the museum,” Jeff adds, “which are now the dinosaurs of the racing world. They started out big and heavy, with real pickup bodies, as people competed to have the biggest truck on the block.”

Bigfoot. Photo credit: International Monster Truck Museum.

Bigfoot. Photo credit: International Monster Truck Museum.

And, just as “one thing led to another” in the creation of the IMTM, one thing led to another in the development of monster trucking itself. Here’s what happened.

Early days of monster trucking

No one sat up one day and decided to invent a monster truck. Instead, people gradually began modifying their pickup trucks and competing in truck pulling and mud bogging events. This then evolved into competitions (informal and then more formalized) to create the biggest truck.

People and trucks (with 48-inch-in-diameter wheels) that rose to attention included:

•          Bob Chandler: Bigfoot

•          Everett Jasmer: USA-1

•          Fred Shafer and Jack Willman, Sr.: Bear Foot

•          Jeff Dane: King Kong

Not surprisingly, all of these men – along with Dan Degrasso – were in the first group to be placed in the IMTM’s hall of fame.

In April 1981, Chandler used Bigfoot to drive over and crush cars, planning to use the results as a promotional tool for his business. He then repeated the performance in the Pontiac Silverdome in 1982; this time, the vehicle had tires of 66 inches in diameter. Around this time, the phrase “monster truck” was born. As other people began using 66-inch tires on their vehicles, the vehicles themselves became heavier, ranging from 13,000 to 20,000 pounds each, with super-sized suspension.

Was Chandler the first to perform the car crushing feat? It depends upon whom you ask. Some cite Dane as the first, late in the 1970s, while others believe someone else entirely was the first. What is true is that Chandler has the earliest video and that the Monster Truck Racing Association recognizes him as the first to perform this stunt.

In 1985, monster truck racing began, typically single-elimination races on obstacle courses. As people began to race, the heaviness of early monster trucks worked against them, so they began strategizing over how to lighten their loads and to boost their power, using fiberglass for truck bodies. In 1989, Jack Willman created a vehicle that only weighed 9,000 pounds, a significant reduction.

Monster Truck Racing Association

Goliath. Photo credit: International Monster Truck Museum.

Goliath. Photo credit: International Monster Truck Museum.

The Monster Truck Racing Association (MTRA) formed in 1988, setting safety standards. “We pride ourselves on being the safest motor sport, considering the number of events, for both participants and spectators,” says Marty Garza, director of communications for MTRA. “I credit that to the foresight of people in the association who proactively brainstorm for solutions for potential problems, rather than being reactive after an issue has happened. We risk being called alarmists, but we have a safety record that is unmatched.”

Five years later, in 1993, freestyle exhibitions began to appear at racing events for drivers to show off their fancy moves; in 2000 freestyling became a competition event.

“Part of the appeal of monster trucks,” says Marty, “is the unpredictability of the sport. Freestyling, for example, brings with it an X Games type of excitement. The height of the trucks, the amount of noise that monster trucking creates – well, it just appeals to the senses as it’s shockingly loud and highly energizing.”

Who are the fans?

Monster Truck Racing Association Online stated in 2010 that more than a million people attend monster truck events annually, with demographics matching those of people who buy pickup trucks. That makes perfect sense.

Then, according to Media Life Magazine in 2010: “Motorsports do bring in some moms and kids, but the majority of attendees are young male gearheads. The crowds are roughly two-thirds male, and more than 75 percent are age 44 or younger.”

Later in the article, though, a statistic shows greater female enjoyment of the events; according to Scarborough Research, when looking at adults who have attended a monster truck event within the past 12 months:

•          57% are males

•          43% are females

Wondering about ages?

•          22%: ages 18-24

•          28%: 25-34

•          27%: 35-44

•          15%: 45-54

•          6%: 55-64

•          2%: 65+

Income?

•          15%: below $25,000

•          22%: $25,000-$39,000

•          11%: $40,000-$49,000

•          17%: $50,000-$74,999

•          15%: $75,000-$99,999

•          12%: $100,000-$149,000

•          8%: $150,000 and up

Jeff Cook brings up another point about demographics: that children also attend monster truck events. “You see grandparents, parents and kids,” he says. “Events tend to be family oriented in that you see all ages and everyone seems to get something out of it.”

Predator. Photo credit: International Monster Truck Museum.

Predator. Photo credit: International Monster Truck Museum.

In fact, Jeff himself was one of those kids who was fascinated by big vehicles. “I was always wanting to put bigger tires on my toys,” he says, “and then I saw Bigfoot. I told my father that I wanted a truck like that someday and that I thought we should build one. Videos just don’t do monster trucks justice. You need to see them in action, in person, to see these massive vehicles going 60 to 80 mph as they do their stunts.”

The future of the sport

“All of this attention to monster trucks has boggled our minds. Ten to fifteen years ago, it seemed like nobody even knew what a monster truck was. We thought attention to events would slow down and top out, but people continue to get more and more performance out of their vehicles, with better technology and bigger stunts.

In other racing sports, vehicles are fragile, but monsters are durable. They can roll over, crash – and then keep going. So the drivers keep pushing the envelope, running it to the edge, especially since fiberglass truck bodies of today can be fixed much more easily. Monster truck racing, though, is still more of a bragging rights race. I think it will someday turn into racing for money, with more racing series and more corporate sponsors.” (Jeff Cook)

 

The Ford Mustang turns 50!

Ford MustangWe wanted to tip our hats to the Ford Motor Company and its fleet-wheeled filly, the Ford Mustang.

It was 50 years ago this week that the iconic muscle car made it’s debut, turning legions of casual drivers into die-hard fans.

Over the years, the Mustang has changed–for better and for worse–but has remained a beloved staple in automotive form and function, and a symbol of Americana.

Wired Magazine states:

Fifty years ago today, Ford unveiled the Mustang. It was a sleek and sporty car, named for a fighter plane and slightly European in flavor. Company brass hoped it might be something of a hit and expected to sell 100,000 of them in the first year.

They sold 22,000 on the first day.

Those are excellent stats, even by today’s standards.

Here’s more on the history of the Ford Mustang, courtesy of Wired:

Work on the Mustang began in 1960, when Ford’s marketing Mad Man Lee Iacocca realized the company needed to attract young buyers. He wanted something new, something unique, something to tap into the era’s sense of national optimism. Most importantly, he wanted “something that would be sporty but not a sports car,” said Bob Casey, an automotive historian and former curator of the The Henry Ford Museum.

 

You can read more from this informative piece at Wired Magazine.

And, check out our own resident Gearhead’s comprehensive blog on the 2014 Mustang GT.

Kudos to Ford on the 50th Anniversary of the Ford Mustang!

 

Writing off your car for business use

1040_tax_formWith tax time upon us, we thought we’d try to spread some positive news, especially as it relates to your car.

If you use your car for business, did you know you can write some of its costs off?

According to Tax Topic 510 – Business Use of Car on IRS.gov:

If you use your car in your job or business and you use it only for that purpose, you may deduct its entire cost of operation.

That’s a pretty good deal in our book. But we aware, if you use your car for personal use, you can only deduct the operation costs (gas, maintenance, etc.) for the portion dedicated to actual business use. Sorry, taking the kids to soccer games doesn’t count and neither does competing on the drag strip – unless of course, you own the team!

On another note, if you find yourself in the enviable position of getting a tax refund this year, you can maximize it by taking advantage of the great deals at Advance Auto Parts–to get all those projects done in 2014.

Cheers!

 

The Scion Rock Fest Returns for Sixth Annual Festival

Scion Rock FestScion Audio Visual’s annual hard rock/metal festival, Scion Rock Fest, returns to Pomona, California on May 17, 2014 with an all-star line-up of hard rock and metal heroes.

In keeping with its rich tradition of cutting-edge car designs, Scion has curated a killer lineup of bands and artists for this one-of-a-kind music festival.

 

Headlining this year’s Scion Rock Fest, are heavy faves Machine Head and High On Fire. Other prominent artists appearing on the sixth installment of Scion Rock Fest are Red Fang, King Buzzo, Hot Lunch, Pins of Light and Windhand.

Since the 2009 debut of Scion Rock Fest, the annual outing has featured Mastodon, Down, Neurosis, Baroness, Morbid Angel and the Melvins. A rotating location has found the Fest in  Atlanta, Columbus, Tampa, Memphis as well as the 2011 event, which was also in Pomona. To RSVP, visit Scion Rock Fest.

Scion Rock Fest is one of the many music and cultural events curated by Scion Audio Visual, the entertainment division founded by Scion in 2003.

About Scion Audio Visual:

Scion Audio Visual (AV for short) is a creative enterprise of Scion devoted to the discovery, nurture, funding and distribution of compelling music and arts programming. Scion AV has created and championed projects for over 100 underground musical artists, supported tours and special events, created film documentaries, curated art installations, and produced a collection of ‘zines. Scion A/V Metal is specifically dedicated to the support of metal artists via content and events held nationwide.

About Scion:

Scion, from Toyota Motor Sales was developed with a new generation of youthful buyers in mind. The Scion FR-S made our list of best cars for first-time drivers earlier this year. Scion’s mission is to provide distinctive products, the opportunity to personalize, and an innovative, consumer-driven process at the retail level. For more information, visit Scion.com.