Pro Am Kart Race Benefits Children

Pro Am kart race  photoPatrick Long’s Pro Am Kart Race to Benefit All Children’s Hospital. It’s a long name, for sure, but the cause is simple: to generate donations and support for All Children’s Hospital John Hopkins Medicine while creating fantastic memories for everyone involved. This hospital is a “leading center for pediatric treatment, education, and research . . . specializes in providing care for newborns through teen(s) and is the only specialty licensed children’s hospital on Florida’s west coast.”

Pro Am kart race 3 photoBecause this benefit is a Pro-Am race, racing junkies go head-to-head with their motorsports heroes who, less than 24 hours earlier, competed in the 12 Hours of Sebring. For many novice racers in 2015, the entry fee was worth its weight in gold to share a track and make friends with drivers that most fans only meet on television.

Celebrity drivers

The race was held on March 22nd. Well known participants include Porsche factory driver, ALMS champion and Daytona, Sebring and Le Mans winner, Patrick Long; NASCAR Truck Rookie of the Year, ALMS & Grand-Am driver, and Daytona speed record holder, Colin Braun; Champ car, ALMS, and Grand-Am driver, Jan Heylen; and Delta wing driver, Katherine Legge, among other professional drivers.

Event coverage

karting 6 pictureNow, don’t be fooled! While the mood was lighthearted and cheerful, competition was fierce. The classic Le Mans style start kicked off the festivities with a sense of spirited rivalry as, for more than 1.5 hours, teams rotated through their drivers and karts.Pro Am kart race 7 photo

This afternoon event raised a whopping $65,000 for All Children’s Hospital, through a combination of entry fees, buying laps back in an attempt to win, a silent auction, a regular auction – and generous donations.

Auction items included race suits and artwork, with one team going above and beyond, donating the trophy they’d won the day before at Sebring. The gentleman who made the highest bid graciously returned the trophy to the winning driver and team, wanting simply to show his appreciation for their selfless donation while also contributing to the cause.

Pro Am kart race 1 photoThat gesture will be hard to beat – and yet, the karting fans who participate in the All Children’s Hospital benefit race are just the ones to raise up the generosity ante in 2016. So, stay tuned!

 

 

 

Volvo’s Drive-E 4-Cylinder Engines to Get a Boost from Polestar Factory Tuning Kits

Volvo var picture

According to Car and Driver, when Volvo announced it was producing another run of its sporty S60 and V60 Polestar models to meet unexpected demand, it also mentioned that there were plans in the works to spread goodness from its racing partner Polestar to other models. Just a few months later, Volvo has confirmed exactly that: it will be rolling out a slew of tuning kits for models equipped with the automaker’s next-generation Drive-E turbocharged four-cylinder engines.

While Polestar currently offers a power kit for Volvo’s turbocharged 3.0-liter inline-six—and modifies things slightly more for the full-blown S60 and V60 Polestar models—future Volvos will be powered exclusively by smaller engines. Specifically, they’ll be powered solely by Drive-E three- and four-cylinder engines, so getting a head start on juicing more power from them now makes perfect sense.

So far, Volvo has said only that the new “Polestar Performance Optimization” for the Drive-E engines will encompass the whole family, including the gasoline-fed T6 and T5 (both 2.0-liter turbo fours, only with different outputs), as well as the diesel D4 and D5 fours offered globally. (Confusingly, the old turbo inline-six is also referred to internally as “T6,” but as we said, its days are numbered.) Unlike today’s Polestar power kit, the Polestar Performance Optimization (PPO) not only adds power, but it also tweaks the transmission on automatic-transmission variants.

Final output figures and pricing is still to come; we’re also awaiting official confirmation that the Polestar kits will be offered stateside. We can’t imagine that the brand wouldn’t make the Polestar goodies available here, as it already sells the Polestar upgrade for the turbo six-cylinder on U.S.-spec cars.

Read the full story at Car and Driver.

Ford produces ultra-limited run of 2015 Shelby GT350 — 137 total!

2015 Shelby GT350 picture

Photo credit: Autoweek

 

According to the good folks at Autoweek:

It was reported last month that Ford was planning to limit production of the Shelby GT350 and GT350R in 2015 — a few thousand were rumored to be on the build schedule. Turns out this is going to be a far rarer machine, though: Just 100 examples of the GT350 will be built, 50 with the Technology Package and 50 with the Track Package. The 350R will be even more limited, with just 37 examples being produced.

Interestingly, the article points out how this ultra-limited production run ranks in terms of Shelby’s history: “Those production numbers would make the 2015 Shelby GT350 even more exclusive than the 1965 model, of which 562 units were built. The company is building the 37 Rs to pay homage to Shelby’s original run of competition versions of the car.”

The article also lays out some specs: “The 2015 Shelby GT350 debuted at the Los Angeles Auto Show late last year with “more than 500 hp and 400 lb-ft of torque,” Ford says, from a 5.2-liter flat-plane-crank V8. We saw the racier GT350R a few months later when it premiered at the Detroit auto show next to the new Ford GT. The R is lighter, faster and stiffer all around.”

Pricing hasn’t been revealed, but Autoweek thinks that it will be: “somewhere near the Chevy Camaro Z/28’s starting price of $73,000 wouldn’t be out of the question … before your local dealer adds his 300 percent markup.”

The GT350 and GT350R go on sale this fall.

The article goes on to list these option pricing details, pulled from the Mustang 6g Forum:

2015 GT350 Option Pricing (MSRP):

Tech Package = $7,500

Track Package = $6,500

Navigation = $795

Painted Black Roof = $695

Triple Yellow = $495

Over the top stripes = $475

2015 GT350R Option Pricing (MSRP):

R Package (over base GT350) = $3,500

SVT Touring Package = $3,000

Navigation = $795

Read the full story at Autoweek.

12 Hours of Sebring: Corvette finishes first

Sebring corvette

Photo credit: Mike Raffia

Check out our exclusive coverage and photos from the recent 12 Hours of Sebring in 2015.

Let’s face it. The Chevy brand couldn’t have asked for a better weekend.

Chevy took the 12 Hours of Sebring by storm at the 63rd annual racing event held on Saturday, March 21 in Sebring, Florida. Corvette Racing dominated, securing the podium for the Daytona Prototype field and sneaking in a solid first place in GTLM.

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Photo credit: Mike Raffia

Besides pleasing ‘vette fans, the combination of a Chevy bowtie and a stellar weekend will undoubtedly make corporate happy. After all, Corvette’s racing heritage boosts sales.

Corvette’s win was a Porsche loss

In GTLM, the #3 Corvette took first place partially because of equipment failures on the leading Porsche RSR during pit stops near the end of the race. Staying at the front through 12 hours with blazing hot track temps and numerous cautions is no easy feat – and, in this case at least, the Porsche wasn’t up to the challenge.

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Photo credit: Mike Raffia

The reality is that there is no shortage of driver challenges in a race like this that can knock a great team out of the running. The winning formula typically consists of effectively timing pit shops, executing flawless driver changes, staying out of traffic and avoiding costly mistakes caused by fatigue.

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Photo credit: Mike Raffia

In 2015, on the Sebring race track that once served as Hendricks Army Airfield, it was Corvette Racing that took home the trophy and bragging rights. 2016? It’s anyone’s guess.

 

 

More photos from Sebring 2015:

Sebring 13 picture

Photo credit: Mike Raffia

Sebring 6 photo

Photo credit: Mike Raffia

Sebring 11 picture

Photo credit: Mike Raffia

Sebring 14 photo

Photo credit: Mike Raffia

Sebring 8 picture

Photo credit: Mike Raffia

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Photo credit: Mike Raffia

 

 

Exotic Car Festival returns to Celebration – and Advance was there

Celebration Exotic car 1 picture

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Advance Auto Parts returned to picturesque Celebration, Florida for the 2015 Celebration Exotic Car Festival. You may remember our 2014 coverage of the festival and the spectacular gathering of modern classics present for the show.

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

As we’ve come to expect from this event, we were stunned. Six of the most sought after Ferrari “halo cars” were present; the 288 GTO, F40, F50, Enzo and FXX–plus the car that former Top Gear presenter James May referred to as “The Ferrari, The Ferrari.”

Yes, Ferrari’s newest hypercar, the Ferrari La Ferrari, was present. Most people consider themselves lucky to see just one of these types of cars up close and in person, so it’s a once-in-a-lifetime treat to see all six of these cars together.

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Erik Baeumlisberger

The La Ferrari and FXX may have been showstoppers, but a not-too-shabby Porsche 918 Spyder was also on display alongside a McLaren P1. Other notable participants included an LS1-swapped DeLorean, Porsche GT3 RS, Jaguar XJ220 and America’s-own supercar of the 1980s and 90s: the Vector.

CE5 car engine

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Celebrity appearances and movie tie-ins

Celebrity appearances and movie tie-ins have become a trademark of this event. This year, we were treated to a screen-used 1970 Dodge Charger from the Fast and Furious franchise along with a life-size replica of Dominic Toretto, courtesy of Madam Tussauds Wax Museum.

CE5 7 picture

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Also part of the 2015 event was a performance by The Beach Boys featuring John Stamos (Uncle Jessie) and a Happy Days reunion with Henry Winkler (the Fonz), Anson Williams (Potsie) and Donny Most (Ralph Malph).

Celebration Exotic car show

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Since its inception 12 years ago, the Celebration Exotic Car Festival has raised more than $1 million for charities, which include Make-A-Wish Foundation, Special Olympics and the Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children.

We look forward to checking it out in 2016!

For now, check out more amazing car photos from the event:

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Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

 

 

 

 

Pittsburgh Dodge Challenger SRT Runs 10s in its First Time Out — Unmodified!

2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat pictureAccording to Torque News:

This past weekend, 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat owner Ricci Cavallaro took his stock Mopar muscle car to Pittsburgh Raceway Park for the first time and with nothing more than Nitto NT05 tires, his first run down the track was an incredible 10.97 at 129 miles per hour. Then, he followed it up with two more runs in the 10 second range.

Long-time Mopar fan Cavallaro—who is not a professional driver—took his new supercharged muscle car to PRP, taking advantage of the good weather and a well-prepped track, and it paid off better than anyone could’ve predicted.

That’s insane, especially for a mostly unmodified vehicle!

Check out the full story on this spectacular SRT at Torque News.

Watch Ricci’s first incredible 1/4 mile pass here:

It’s tax time – get last-minute car deduction tips!

Truck with cash pictureThe question often comes up around here at the DIY Garage on what you can and can’t write off in regards to your vehicle at tax time.

After doing a little digging, we found this informative piece on a deduction made possible by the The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, back in 2009.

According to H&R Block:

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act lets you deduct state and local sales and excise taxes you paid on the purchase of a new:

  • Car
  • Light truck
  • Motor home
  • Motorcycle

The deduction is currently available on new vehicles bought from Feb. 17, 2009, through Dec. 31, 2014. You can deduct either of these:

  • State and local sales taxes, including those paid on a new vehicle
  • State and local income taxes

You can’t deduct both.

If you deduct sales taxes, you can either:

  • Save sales receipts and deduct actual sales taxes paid
  • Use the IRS’s sales tax tables to figure the deduction. You can find the tables in the Form 1040 instructions.

The deduction is limited to the taxes and fees paid on up to $49,500 of the purchase price of an eligible vehicle. The deduction is reduced for:

  • Married filing jointly with modified adjusted gross incomes (AGI) of $250,000 to $260,000
  • Other taxpayers with modified AGI of $125,000 to $135,000

If your income is higher, you don’t qualify.

How will you spend your tax deduction?

If you’re lucky enough to get one, tell us what kind of DIY project you plan to take on in the comments below!

The Wonders of Sea Foam

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We explore the rich history and impact of this magical elixir.

It’s a beautiful spring day and so you decide to drive to a car show and take pictures of the new vehicles on display. You carefully fold up your map of the area and put it into your glove box. You make sure that you have extra rolls of 35mm film, you do some quick maintenance on your car  and you plan to return home in time to get your film to the drug store that develops your photos…

Quick question: did this scenario take place in 2015? Why or why not?

The answer to part one is: highly unlikely. This paragraph is chock full of products and scanrios that, if not obsolete, are definitely headed that way – which makes the story of Sea Foam all the more amazing.

“This product was invented in the 1930s,” says Sea Foam’s marketing director, Brian Miller, “and trademarked in 1942. Sea Foam was invented in a time when engines were much less sophisticated than they are today, with fuel that was quite different from today’s options. And yet, the same Sea Foam that improved the quality of fuel then still works every bit as well today.”

Glimpse back into the 1930s

Fred Fandrei enjoyed fishing, but he frequently experienced problems with his outboard motor. He diagnosed it as gummy varnish created by the gas and oil needed to power his engine and the “thought of spending more time fishing than working on the motor prompted Fred, who was a District Manager for the Sinclair Refining Company at that time and had a good knowledge of fuel, to invent a product that would stop the gas/oil mixture from becoming stale.”

Fred stored his product in beer bottles and quart jars and sold it to other fishermen. When one of them asked him for some of his “Sea Foam” stuff, Fred liked the name and began using it for his concoction. He advertised in Field and Stream and Outdoor Life for a while but the market demand soon started shifting from marine to automotive.

To give you a sense of the latest and greatest innovations in the car world during that era: they included low-pressure balloon tires, replacing those hard tires of the past, and windshield wipers, along with synchromesh transmissions for smoother shifting, automatic chokes, built-in trunks, hydraulic brakes and gear shifts on steering columns. Most cars now boasted both radios and heaters, and still featured foot boards and sunshades on the car’s windscreens. Radiator grilles tilted back slightly and were often made of flashy-looking chrome – and Henry Ford invented the one-piece V-8 engine for the common man. Here’s more about the cars of 1930s – and now we’ll move onto discussing what has made Sea Foam so effective for more than seventy years.Sea Foam can 2 picture

Wonders of Sea Foam

All carbon-based fuels and engine oils leave behind petroleum-based residue. Over time, these naturally build up and eventually prevent lifters and rings from working as they should, and this residue also affects injectors, pistons and intake valves. For optimum engine performance, car owners need to periodically do a clean-up job – and Brian explains how Sea Foam accomplishes this task using a petroleum-blended product.

Now, this can seem counter-intuitive. Why on earth would you use petroleum to clean up the residue from petroleum?

Brian offers a clear and concise explanation. “If you’ve ever gotten oil-based paint on your hands,” he says, “you know that using water to clean yourself up only makes matters worse. Instead, you use something oil based to remove the paint. The same is true when you want to clean your engine. The petroleum solvency cleans your fuel system and removes gummy substances that hinder performance – and is harmless to your engine.” As the company website describes the process, “Sea Foam helps slowly and safely re-liquefy this varnish so contaminants and deposits can be safely cleaned out of the systems as the engine is operated.”

Other additives on the market are either detergent based or use a combination of detergent and petroleum, Brian says, although he is quick to add that he has respect for competing additive brands. “We don’t tear them down to make ourselves look good,” he says. “Instead, we talk about how quickly and consistently Sea Foam solves problems.”

Sea Foam can also help, according to the company website, with lack of lubrication and with absorption of moisture from the atmosphere and condensation. And, here’s an overall message about the product from the company: “Sea Foam can be used by professionals and do-it-yourselfers alike to help safely eliminate many contamination and lubrication related performance problems and help prolong the life of an engine. A clean, dry and well lubricated engine will run smoother and more efficiently.”

What people say about Sea Foam

Marketing directors usually share a remarkable story or two about someone who has had incredible success in using their product. Brian, though, was an exception to the rule, providing no stories of nuclear-level success. He instead emphasizes how quickly and consistently the product has worked for a wide range of challenges over several decades – and how the product continues to do that, even as engines and fuels evolve and become more sophisticated.

“Stories from satisfied customers are so common,” Brian says, “that no one story stands out. Whether someone needs to deal with engine hesitation, poor idling or rough performance – and whether that person wants better performance out of a pickup truck, a sports car, or even a chain saw, their problems are quickly resolved.”

If he were to wear a Sea Foam t-shirt into a grocery store, he says, people would walk up to him to share their stories. “It’s fun to meet people who are excited about their experiences,” he adds, “and as long as we use carbon-based fuels, there will be degradation of that fuel, and we’ll still be relevant. We’ll still be around to help.”

Editor’s note: Advance Auto Parts carries the Sea Foam products your car needs.

 

 

Cracking the code: your vehicle identification number

VIN code photoThe VIN (vehicle identification number) of your car has been described as its fingerprint – no other vehicle can have the exact same one, even if the other vehicle is close enough to yours to be its “twin.” It’s also been compared to your car’s social security number.

VINs first existed in 1954, but their length and code values were not yet standardized. That changed in 1981, when the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) began requiring standardized VINs for any vehicle that took to the road.

As far as the number’s location in your vehicle, NHTSA says the VIN must be inside the vehicle, and visible through the windshield when you’re looking through the left windshield pillar. It must also – fairly enough – be readable.

The main purpose of the VIN is to definitively identify a specific vehicle, but its usage goes beyond that. According to DMV.org (a privately owned, non-governmental site), “deciphering these codes is a hobby for some car enthusiasts, including collectors who want to own one of the first or last cars to come off an assembly line.” Plus, of course, it’s a great way to understand the history of your vehicle – or the vehicle you’re thinking about buying.

So, you know how we are . . . curious minds want to know, and so we’ve decided to crack the code . . .

Truth – or urban myth?

Myth busting is fun and, if you look online, you’ll find plenty of places willing to tell you that a man named Steve Maxwell “invented” the VIN. Steve apparently didn’t fully understand the value of his invention, as he apparently wrote it down on the back of a bar napkin and sold the idea to a far shrewder tavern patron for $1,000. The VIN, we are assured, “soon evolved” into today’s system.

True or false? Unfortunately, we don’t know. Snopes had nothing to say on the matter and a search on Google patents didn’t shed any light, either. At some point, we knew we needed to cry uncle and get back to selling car parts – and so we did. But, if you know the answer about Steve Maxwell, we’d love to hear your info!

Back to the matter at hand . . .

Breakdown of the VIN

Not surprisingly, we found conflicting information online, but we were able to track down specifics from the authoritative source, NHSTA, along with other information-rich sites such as ResearchManiacs.com.

Today’s VIN contains 17 letters and numbers and is really a conglomerate of three sets of numbers:

  • World manufacturer identifier (WMI): characters 1 through 3
  • Vehicle descriptor section (VDS): characters 4 through 8
  • Vehicle identifier section (VIS): characters 9 through 17

World manufacturer identifier: WMI

The first letter or number reveals the continent where the vehicle was made:

• A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H: Africa
• J, K, L, M, N, P, and R: Asia
• S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, and Z: Europe
• 1, 2, 3, 4, 5: North America
• 6 and 7: Oceania
• 8 and 9: South America

The second letter or number identifies the country where the vehicle was made. As ResearchManiacs.com reminds us, though, “NOT all Japanese cars are made in Japan and NOT all GM cars are made in America and so on.” Here’s how you can decode that second letter or number in your VIN.

The third letter or number identifies the type of vehicle it is – a car or truck, for example, or a bus or motorcycle. Each manufacturer uses different codes – and, there’s good news and there’s bad news about that. The bad news is that it can be a bit of a hassle to track down your manufacturer’s coding system for that third digit. The good news is that it’s fairly unlikely that you don’t already know if you own a car or a truck, a bus or a motorcycle. (If you aren’t sure, ask a buddy.)Car VIN number

Note: If a vehicle is manufactured by a “low-volume” company – one that produces fewer than 1,000 of a particular vehicle per year – it will have the number 9 in the third character, as well as in the 12th, 13th and 14th placeholders.

Vehicle descriptor section: VDS

Letters and numbers in the VDS provide information about the vehicle model, engine type, body style and so forth. Again, each manufacturer devises its own codes. Fortunately, there are multiple VIN decoder sites such as this one that can decipher the meaning behind the characters. The one we’ve linked to works for cars manufactured by:

A-F H-K M-P R-V
Alfa Romeo Honda Mazda Renault
Audi Hyundai Mercedes Benz Seat
BMW Jeep Mitsubishi Subaru
Buick Kia Nissan Suzuki
Citroen Opel Skoda
Chevrolet Peugeot Toyota
Ford Pontiac Volkswagen
Fiat Porsche Volvo

 

Note: the character in position 9 is the VIN check digit that is used to determine if it is a correct VIN and to help prevent VIN fraud. It does not tell you anything specific about the actual vehicle.


Vehicle identifier section: VIS

Characters 10 through 17 get down to the nitty-gritty, sharing when a car was built, what options it has and more.

Let’s look at character #10, which is the model year (not the year manufactured). If it’s A, then your car is from 1980 or 2010. To determine this (although it’s probably pretty obvious which one it is), look at character #7. If it’s a number, then your car is pre-2010 (and is therefore 1980). If it’s a letter, then it’s a 2010.

Letter B: It’s either 1981 or 2011; look at character #7 to tell

Letter C: It’s either 1982 or 2012; look at character #7 to tell

You get the pattern. The letter “Z” is not used in this cycle. Instead, once you get to the 2001/2030 option, the tenth character is the numerical 1 (and it goes through the numerical 9). Confused? Use a VIN decoder!

Then, characters 11 through 17 are used in unique ways by each manufacturer to record info, such as the assembly plant, options on the vehicle and so forth. So, track down the coding for your specific manufacturer. (Or use a VIN decoder!)

Useful fact: If a VIN contains the letters I, O or Q, then it’s not a real VIN. That’s because it’s too easy to confuse those letters with the numerical 0 and 1, and so they are avoided. And, character ten cannot be the letters U and Z or the numerical 0. You can use this info to dazzle your friends and/or to identify false VINs. Or to make yourself feel better if you needed to ask your buddy if you rode a motorcycle or drove a bus (to help figure out character 3 of your VIN).

For more information

There is plenty of (dry) reading material available at the NHTSA site. There is also an article at Wikipedia that cites credible sources for its reporting.

What questions do you have about your VIN? What scoop can you share about the Steve Maxwell mystery? Please share in the comments below!

VIN graphic courtesy of Edmunds.

Euro Tripper 2015: Advance on the Fort Myers scene

EuroTripper 10

Check out this amazing photo exhibit from recent events in Fort Myers.

Enthusiasts from around the world love a quality car show – and it just doesn’t get better than Euro Tripper 3.EuroTripper 16 car

Some shows are only about the cars, while others are also a chance to catch up with good friends. Still others, like the Euro Tripper, offer entertainment for the entire family, striving to make it a good time for everyone.

EuroTripper 15 car

In year three we’ve seen Paul Barney, the show creator, grow the show tremendously. This year featured a new location, new entertainment – and, as always, lots and lots of rescue animals from Brookes Legacy Animal Rescue available for adoption. People had the opportunity to donate food, toys, cash and more to the rescue operation, with parking fees donated to Brookes Legacy.

EuroTripper 14 car

Brand spanking new location

Sponsored by the local VW dealership in Fort Myers, Euro Tripper moved from a hockey arena parking lot to a new location at Jet Blue Park, the spring home of the Boston Red Sox. The show field had cars from all along the east coast of the U.S. and even a traveler in his Mk6 GTI all the way from Mexico.

EuroTripper 13 picture

More about the cars . . . while newer Volkswagens, BMWs and Audis covered half of the show field, a great showing of air-cooled classics lined the perimeter. For those along for the fun and maybe not so much the cars, Paul brought out a team of BMX riders for family entertainment.

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Giveaways have become a tradition at Euro Tripper and v.3 of the show brought a raffle for an air ride management kit, a set of brand new wheels and countless other smaller prizes. Many went home very happy that day. Wouldn’t you be?

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Thumbs up!

Thanks to all the volunteers, workers at Jet Blue Park and sponsors for making Euro Tripper 3 another entertaining weekend for everyone involved. See you at Euro Tripper 4!

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Editor’s note: As you head out to car shows this season, make sure your ride’s appearance is firing on all cylinders. Advance Auto Parts can help–with a wide assortment of appearance chemicals, accessories and more, all at great values. 

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