SoWo 2015: German cars and Southern hospitality

SOWO1If you’re a fan of cars and see something cool, you’ll want to have it, whether it’s a monster engine or a cutting-edge body design. And, if you’re an enthusiast, there is no cure. This is a permanent condition.

Here are examples. If Europeans have a 500 horsepower hatchback, well, we want it in the United States. Meanwhile, the US has 800-horsepower V8s and so the Europeans want these rocket ships. Then, American enthusiasts want German-made accessories – and the beat goes on, the wheel keeps spinning – and the best part is that this craze for the coolest will never end. That’s what keeps the car world’s heart beating and technology advancing.SOWO 3 photo

German experience without the passport

A trip to Germany could cost you in the thousands – even tens of thousands – but we’ve found a better way: Southern Worthersee. SoWo is a true destination show that helps European car lovers in America get together for the German experience, perhaps even including a bit of schnitzel.

SOWO 9 photoThis weekend is all about Bugs, Things, and Golf(s), but most German makes are welcomed in town, just not in the show field. That area is reserved exclusively for Volkswagen group cars like Audi, VW and Porsche, for the brand purists in all of us.

Mountain river tubing and epic scenic drives – and of course, German cars and Southern hospitality – combined to bring more than 20,000 people to the hills of Helen, Georgia for SoWo 9 on May 16th and 17th. The streets of this small town were packed end to end with vendors from homegrown designer brands to globally famous tuning brands. VW joined the fun with their motorsports toys from the stable, giving fans a rare up-close and personal look.SOWO 12 photo

For even more SoWo, here is our coverage of SoWo 2013.

Future of SoWo

Southern Worthersee is widely considered one of the best VW shows in existence today. You may hear that some rowdy show goers and enthusiastic locals, plus a few too many tire peels, may have put this show’s bright future in jeopardy. We will stay tuned in hopes that it ultimately continues in some form, as it’s truly a rare opportunity in life to share your classic European car in the Americas.

More photos from SOWO 2015:

SOWO 14 photoSOWO 15 photoSOWO 17 pictureSOWO 22 photoSOWO 13 photoSOWO 23 photoSOWO 6SOWO 5 photo

469,000 Chevy Malibus recalled for seat belt issues

2012 Chevy Malibu picture

Photo credit: General Motors

According to the Detroit News, General Motors is recalling approximately 469,000 of its Chevy Malibus, model years 2011-12, due to seat belt issues.

The article states:

The flexible steel cable that connects the safety belt to the vehicle can fatigue and separate over time. Dealers will replace the outboard lap mounting bracket to relocate the tensioner slightly rearward. Dealers will inspect the cable and, if necessary, replace the lap pretensioner.

Further, according to the story, “GM knows of 36 claims, no crashes or fatalities and one minor injury reportedly related to the condition — when a taxi driver bumped his head.”

Read the full article to learn more about the General Motors recall of the Chevy Malibu.

Grateful Dead of motorsports: lawn mower racing

Lawn Mowing Race1 photo

Imagine this help wanted ad: Do you enjoy motorsports (wishing they weren’t so dang expensive!) and love to tinker? Do you get into competition – and yet are the kind of person who will readily reach out a hand to help? Do you appreciate green grass, apple pie and spending time with friends and family? And, oh yes, do you have a good sense of humor and enjoy having fun? If so, we need YOU to race a lawn mower.

We at Advance Auto Parts have been hearing more and more about the grassroots sport of lawn mower racing across the country and we know that many of our readers love to DIY. So we talked to a couple of lawn mower racing diehards and are bringing you the results of our conversations.

Modifying a lawn mower into a racing machine

According to Bruce Kaufman (AKA Mr. Mow-It-All), the president of the U.S. Lawn Mower Racing Association (USLMRA), 90% of racing lawn mowers are crafted in someone’s garage, with that “someone” typically having “mechanical ingenuity.”

If you’re interested in giving this a try and want to race in a USLMRA event, Bruce shares that you’ll find a circus atmosphere with a unique and special subculture focused on camaraderie – thus, the connection with the Grateful Dead.

In preparation, you simply start with a self-propelled rotary or reel-style riding lawn mower that was designed and sold commercially, specifically to mow lawns. However you modify the mower, it must remain suitable for lawn mowing, outside of the exceptions listed in the association’s handbook. Having said that, one requirement for race entry is that cutting blades are completely removed from the mower.

Here are other requirements:

  • Non-stock mowers must be equipped with an automatic throttle closing device.
  • All mowers must be equipped with an engine safety cut-off switch.
  • Mower brakes must be in good condition, operating on at least 2 wheels.
  • Fuel must be pump gas. The only additive allowed is STA-BIL Fuel Stabilizer.

Each mower is inspected prior to racing and can be re-inspected at any time. Safety first!

The USLMRA website provides plenty of tips, including this formula:

Small front pulley + large rear pulley = slow!
Large front pulley + small rear pulley = fast!

A tethered kill switch will shut down the engine if you get bucked off, and it needs securely attached to the driver and the mower. The blade deck should remain in place, solidly bolted to hold your weight without swaying. You can install a hand or foot throttle, and most racers replace the front axle with a stronger one. Review the tech section of the site plus the rulebook thoroughly if you decide to give this a go!

Bruce says that there are 11 racing classes and, although none of them permit blades, the resulting racing machines range from “mild to wild.” Typically, modifications are made to carburetors and engines, plus to the chassis. Good brakes are crucial, Bruce says, as is reliable steering. That’s because, as horsepower is added, it also needs controlled on this racing machine that has no suspension. Bruce then mysteriously adds that there are “secret speed tricks that inspectors will never know . . .” Hmmm.

Built for speed

If you’ve never attended a lawn mower race, you might scoff at what you imagine they’d consider “speed.” If so, then you might be shocked to know that even ESPN reported when lawn mowing star Bobby Cleveland broke the speed record by going more than 96 miles per hour! That’s right. Bobby reached an astonishing speed of 96.529 mph on September 25, 2010, beating out the previous record of Don Wales of Britain (who had broken Cleveland’s previous record of 80.792 mph with a speed of 87.833 mph!) and bringing the speed record back to the good ol’ U.S. of A.

Not surprisingly, then, Bobby is a proud member of the USLMRA National Lawn Mower Racing Hall of Fame, founded for “Turf Titans who have turned a weekend chore into a competitive sport.” He has clinched more than 75 first place victories and nine STA-BIL Series National Championships. He built the world’s first “Monster Mower” and also holds the world record for monster mower jumping. He has “always loved to ride motorcycles, race lawn mowers, build hot rods and tinker in the garage. His passion for motors and what makes them work runs as deep as his appetite for Southern BBQ, sweet tea and being on the road.”

Broad appeal of the sport

Although it’s the champions who make the headlines, Bruce says that the sport appeals to a wide swath of people, youngsters as well as grandpas, and every age demographic in between. He says that it’s common to see relatives participate in racing together, adding that the “family that mows together, grows together.” Because this activity is more affordable than the typical motorsport, that makes it even more family friendly. More specifically, costs of participating typically run in the $100s to the $1,000s, according to Bruce, not the tens of thousands.

Racers must belong to the USLMRA as well as to a sanctioned affiliated club. Racers can be as young as eight, although all under the age of 18 need parental permission. “Participants run the gamut of socioeconomic classes and geographical boundaries,” Bruce says, with Aaron Crowl (president of the American Racing Mower Association) adding that he and his family have raced against “people getting started in life to people who have retired after a long and successful career, from people who perform manual labor to business executives, doctors and people with Ph.Ds., and from teachers to school principals.” (When Aaron refers to his family, he means his wife and their twin daughters.)

Both Bruce and Aaron compare the racing environment to that of a family reunion complete with camping, camaraderie and food (and, as Aaron points out, “sometimes a weird but lovable person who reminds you of your Uncle Al”). Both men point out that this atmosphere can exist because no one races for a purse, merely for fun, a trophy and some bragging rights. Rivals may challenge you to the nth degree – and yet, when your engine falters, they’ll give you a wrench, a spare part, or even an entire engine.

“If someone came to a race who was TOO competitive,” Bruce muses, “I’d probably say, ‘Dude, you need to do something else.’ Motivation to win is good but, if you’re too serious about winning, you’d tend not to fit in.” To honor people who perform selfless acts in helping others, the racing organization gives out the Spirit and Spark Award.

Another requirement for participation, although an unofficial one, seems to be a love of bad puns. When you attend, you’ll meet people and vehicles with nicknames like Geronimow, Sodzilla and Prograsstinator, with the president of USMLRA being affectionately known as the grasshole.

Despite the sense of silliness that graces the sport, races are nevertheless judged fairly and professionally, with a computer-based scoring system that monitors race times to 1/1,000 of a second, with results posted quickly online, along with season-to-date rankings.

Past to present – to predictions

When asked about the evolution of the sport, Bruce gives a shout-out to STA-BIL Fuel Stabilizer, which he says has nurtured this sport along from its inception (okay, so he actually said they’ve “watered the grass of this sport from the start”). He also shares how he’s seen the technology of racing lawn mowers evolve thanks to the creativity of participants and how the potential of speed has increased with the technological improvements.

Meanwhile, Aaron notes how, early on, racers needed to be especially creative because nobody was making parts specifically for racing mowers. As the sport has grown, though, niche high performance parts have become available, opening the sport to people who couldn’t effectively adapt parts intended for another purpose for their racing machine.Lawn Mowing Race 2 photo

As for the future, Aaron sees super modified mowers becoming increasingly common, those that are lower and wider than previous models, but still recognizable as mowers. “I have mixed emotions about that change, actually,” he admits, “being old school. But you have to be realistic about the future.”

Bruce doesn’t see mowers becoming much faster, believing that current models are at the peak of what can safely be allowed – and both men envision and hope for further expansion of local clubs and community events centering on the quirky yet exciting motorsport of lawn mower racing.

Even if you don’t plan to race, you’ll probably still mow this spring and summer. Find the lawn and garden parts you need online at Advance Auto Parts.

Pro Am Kart Race Benefits Children

Pro Am kart race  photoPatrick Long’s Pro Am Kart Race to Benefit All Children’s Hospital. It’s a long name, for sure, but the cause is simple: to generate donations and support for All Children’s Hospital John Hopkins Medicine while creating fantastic memories for everyone involved. This hospital is a “leading center for pediatric treatment, education, and research . . . specializes in providing care for newborns through teen(s) and is the only specialty licensed children’s hospital on Florida’s west coast.”

Pro Am kart race 3 photoBecause this benefit is a Pro-Am race, racing junkies go head-to-head with their motorsports heroes who, less than 24 hours earlier, competed in the 12 Hours of Sebring. For many novice racers in 2015, the entry fee was worth its weight in gold to share a track and make friends with drivers that most fans only meet on television.

Celebrity drivers

The race was held on March 22nd. Well known participants include Porsche factory driver, ALMS champion and Daytona, Sebring and Le Mans winner, Patrick Long; NASCAR Truck Rookie of the Year, ALMS & Grand-Am driver, and Daytona speed record holder, Colin Braun; Champ car, ALMS, and Grand-Am driver, Jan Heylen; and Delta wing driver, Katherine Legge, among other professional drivers.

Event coverage

karting 6 pictureNow, don’t be fooled! While the mood was lighthearted and cheerful, competition was fierce. The classic Le Mans style start kicked off the festivities with a sense of spirited rivalry as, for more than 1.5 hours, teams rotated through their drivers and karts.Pro Am kart race 7 photo

This afternoon event raised a whopping $65,000 for All Children’s Hospital, through a combination of entry fees, buying laps back in an attempt to win, a silent auction, a regular auction – and generous donations.

Auction items included race suits and artwork, with one team going above and beyond, donating the trophy they’d won the day before at Sebring. The gentleman who made the highest bid graciously returned the trophy to the winning driver and team, wanting simply to show his appreciation for their selfless donation while also contributing to the cause.

Pro Am kart race 1 photoThat gesture will be hard to beat – and yet, the karting fans who participate in the All Children’s Hospital benefit race are just the ones to raise up the generosity ante in 2016. So, stay tuned!




Volvo’s Drive-E 4-Cylinder Engines to Get a Boost from Polestar Factory Tuning Kits

Volvo var picture

According to Car and Driver, when Volvo announced it was producing another run of its sporty S60 and V60 Polestar models to meet unexpected demand, it also mentioned that there were plans in the works to spread goodness from its racing partner Polestar to other models. Just a few months later, Volvo has confirmed exactly that: it will be rolling out a slew of tuning kits for models equipped with the automaker’s next-generation Drive-E turbocharged four-cylinder engines.

While Polestar currently offers a power kit for Volvo’s turbocharged 3.0-liter inline-six—and modifies things slightly more for the full-blown S60 and V60 Polestar models—future Volvos will be powered exclusively by smaller engines. Specifically, they’ll be powered solely by Drive-E three- and four-cylinder engines, so getting a head start on juicing more power from them now makes perfect sense.

So far, Volvo has said only that the new “Polestar Performance Optimization” for the Drive-E engines will encompass the whole family, including the gasoline-fed T6 and T5 (both 2.0-liter turbo fours, only with different outputs), as well as the diesel D4 and D5 fours offered globally. (Confusingly, the old turbo inline-six is also referred to internally as “T6,” but as we said, its days are numbered.) Unlike today’s Polestar power kit, the Polestar Performance Optimization (PPO) not only adds power, but it also tweaks the transmission on automatic-transmission variants.

Final output figures and pricing is still to come; we’re also awaiting official confirmation that the Polestar kits will be offered stateside. We can’t imagine that the brand wouldn’t make the Polestar goodies available here, as it already sells the Polestar upgrade for the turbo six-cylinder on U.S.-spec cars.

Read the full story at Car and Driver.

Ford produces ultra-limited run of 2015 Shelby GT350 — 137 total!

2015 Shelby GT350 picture

Photo credit: Autoweek


According to the good folks at Autoweek:

It was reported last month that Ford was planning to limit production of the Shelby GT350 and GT350R in 2015 — a few thousand were rumored to be on the build schedule. Turns out this is going to be a far rarer machine, though: Just 100 examples of the GT350 will be built, 50 with the Technology Package and 50 with the Track Package. The 350R will be even more limited, with just 37 examples being produced.

Interestingly, the article points out how this ultra-limited production run ranks in terms of Shelby’s history: “Those production numbers would make the 2015 Shelby GT350 even more exclusive than the 1965 model, of which 562 units were built. The company is building the 37 Rs to pay homage to Shelby’s original run of competition versions of the car.”

The article also lays out some specs: “The 2015 Shelby GT350 debuted at the Los Angeles Auto Show late last year with “more than 500 hp and 400 lb-ft of torque,” Ford says, from a 5.2-liter flat-plane-crank V8. We saw the racier GT350R a few months later when it premiered at the Detroit auto show next to the new Ford GT. The R is lighter, faster and stiffer all around.”

Pricing hasn’t been revealed, but Autoweek thinks that it will be: “somewhere near the Chevy Camaro Z/28’s starting price of $73,000 wouldn’t be out of the question … before your local dealer adds his 300 percent markup.”

The GT350 and GT350R go on sale this fall.

The article goes on to list these option pricing details, pulled from the Mustang 6g Forum:

2015 GT350 Option Pricing (MSRP):

Tech Package = $7,500

Track Package = $6,500

Navigation = $795

Painted Black Roof = $695

Triple Yellow = $495

Over the top stripes = $475

2015 GT350R Option Pricing (MSRP):

R Package (over base GT350) = $3,500

SVT Touring Package = $3,000

Navigation = $795

Read the full story at Autoweek.

12 Hours of Sebring: Corvette finishes first

Sebring corvette

Photo credit: Mike Raffia

Check out our exclusive coverage and photos from the recent 12 Hours of Sebring in 2015.

Let’s face it. The Chevy brand couldn’t have asked for a better weekend.

Chevy took the 12 Hours of Sebring by storm at the 63rd annual racing event held on Saturday, March 21 in Sebring, Florida. Corvette Racing dominated, securing the podium for the Daytona Prototype field and sneaking in a solid first place in GTLM.

Sebring 17 picture

Photo credit: Mike Raffia

Besides pleasing ‘vette fans, the combination of a Chevy bowtie and a stellar weekend will undoubtedly make corporate happy. After all, Corvette’s racing heritage boosts sales.

Corvette’s win was a Porsche loss

In GTLM, the #3 Corvette took first place partially because of equipment failures on the leading Porsche RSR during pit stops near the end of the race. Staying at the front through 12 hours with blazing hot track temps and numerous cautions is no easy feat – and, in this case at least, the Porsche wasn’t up to the challenge.

Sebring 4 picture

Photo credit: Mike Raffia

The reality is that there is no shortage of driver challenges in a race like this that can knock a great team out of the running. The winning formula typically consists of effectively timing pit shops, executing flawless driver changes, staying out of traffic and avoiding costly mistakes caused by fatigue.

Sebring 9 picture

Photo credit: Mike Raffia

In 2015, on the Sebring race track that once served as Hendricks Army Airfield, it was Corvette Racing that took home the trophy and bragging rights. 2016? It’s anyone’s guess.



More photos from Sebring 2015:

Sebring 13 picture

Photo credit: Mike Raffia

Sebring 6 photo

Photo credit: Mike Raffia

Sebring 11 picture

Photo credit: Mike Raffia

Sebring 14 photo

Photo credit: Mike Raffia

Sebring 8 picture

Photo credit: Mike Raffia

Sebring 1 picture

Photo credit: Mike Raffia



Exotic Car Festival returns to Celebration – and Advance was there

Celebration Exotic car 1 picture

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Advance Auto Parts returned to picturesque Celebration, Florida for the 2015 Celebration Exotic Car Festival. You may remember our 2014 coverage of the festival and the spectacular gathering of modern classics present for the show.

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

As we’ve come to expect from this event, we were stunned. Six of the most sought after Ferrari “halo cars” were present; the 288 GTO, F40, F50, Enzo and FXX–plus the car that former Top Gear presenter James May referred to as “The Ferrari, The Ferrari.”

Yes, Ferrari’s newest hypercar, the Ferrari La Ferrari, was present. Most people consider themselves lucky to see just one of these types of cars up close and in person, so it’s a once-in-a-lifetime treat to see all six of these cars together.

Celebration Exotic car 9 pic

Erik Baeumlisberger

The La Ferrari and FXX may have been showstoppers, but a not-too-shabby Porsche 918 Spyder was also on display alongside a McLaren P1. Other notable participants included an LS1-swapped DeLorean, Porsche GT3 RS, Jaguar XJ220 and America’s-own supercar of the 1980s and 90s: the Vector.

CE5 car engine

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Celebrity appearances and movie tie-ins

Celebrity appearances and movie tie-ins have become a trademark of this event. This year, we were treated to a screen-used 1970 Dodge Charger from the Fast and Furious franchise along with a life-size replica of Dominic Toretto, courtesy of Madam Tussauds Wax Museum.

CE5 7 picture

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Also part of the 2015 event was a performance by The Beach Boys featuring John Stamos (Uncle Jessie) and a Happy Days reunion with Henry Winkler (the Fonz), Anson Williams (Potsie) and Donny Most (Ralph Malph).

Celebration Exotic car show

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Since its inception 12 years ago, the Celebration Exotic Car Festival has raised more than $1 million for charities, which include Make-A-Wish Foundation, Special Olympics and the Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children.

We look forward to checking it out in 2016!

For now, check out more amazing car photos from the event:


Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger

Photo credit: Erik Baeumlisberger





Pittsburgh Dodge Challenger SRT Runs 10s in its First Time Out — Unmodified!

2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat pictureAccording to Torque News:

This past weekend, 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat owner Ricci Cavallaro took his stock Mopar muscle car to Pittsburgh Raceway Park for the first time and with nothing more than Nitto NT05 tires, his first run down the track was an incredible 10.97 at 129 miles per hour. Then, he followed it up with two more runs in the 10 second range.

Long-time Mopar fan Cavallaro—who is not a professional driver—took his new supercharged muscle car to PRP, taking advantage of the good weather and a well-prepped track, and it paid off better than anyone could’ve predicted.

That’s insane, especially for a mostly unmodified vehicle!

Check out the full story on this spectacular SRT at Torque News.

Watch Ricci’s first incredible 1/4 mile pass here:

It’s tax time – get last-minute car deduction tips!

Truck with cash pictureThe question often comes up around here at the DIY Garage on what you can and can’t write off in regards to your vehicle at tax time.

After doing a little digging, we found this informative piece on a deduction made possible by the The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, back in 2009.

According to H&R Block:

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act lets you deduct state and local sales and excise taxes you paid on the purchase of a new:

  • Car
  • Light truck
  • Motor home
  • Motorcycle

The deduction is currently available on new vehicles bought from Feb. 17, 2009, through Dec. 31, 2014. You can deduct either of these:

  • State and local sales taxes, including those paid on a new vehicle
  • State and local income taxes

You can’t deduct both.

If you deduct sales taxes, you can either:

  • Save sales receipts and deduct actual sales taxes paid
  • Use the IRS’s sales tax tables to figure the deduction. You can find the tables in the Form 1040 instructions.

The deduction is limited to the taxes and fees paid on up to $49,500 of the purchase price of an eligible vehicle. The deduction is reduced for:

  • Married filing jointly with modified adjusted gross incomes (AGI) of $250,000 to $260,000
  • Other taxpayers with modified AGI of $125,000 to $135,000

If your income is higher, you don’t qualify.

How will you spend your tax deduction?

If you’re lucky enough to get one, tell us what kind of DIY project you plan to take on in the comments below!