Name That Part revealed – Cylinder Head

This week’s part is a “Cylinder Head!” Did you get it right? If not, what did you think it was? Let us know in the comments!

For more information about this Cylinder Head, visit Advance Auto Parts.

We’ll see you on Facebook next Monday for another round of Name That Part!

Cylinder Head

Cylinder Head

Show what you know by playing Name That Part at the Advance Auto Parts Facebook page every Monday. How it works: we post a shot of an auto part, and you submit your best guess for a chance to win the admiration of DIY’ers across the globe.

If you’re a “pinner” on Pinterest, follow our Advance Auto Parts Pinterest boards!
Editor’s note: Visit Advance Auto Parts to get those projects kicked into higher gear before summer ends! Save time – buy online, pick up in store!

 

Name That Part revealed – HVA/C Air Door Actuator

If you guessed this week’s part as a “HVAC Air Door Actuator,” you are correct!

For more information about this HVAC Air Door Actuator, visit Advance Auto Parts.

We’ll see you on Facebook next Monday for another round of Name That Part!

HVA/C Air Door Actuator

HVAC Air Door Actuator

Show what you know by playing Name That Part at the Advance Auto Parts Facebook page every Monday. How it works: we post a shot of an auto part, and you submit your best guess for a chance to win the admiration of DIY’ers across the globe.

If you’re a “pinner” on Pinterest, follow our Advance Auto Parts Pinterest boards!
Editor’s note: Visit Advance Auto Parts to get those projects kicked into higher gear before summer ends! Save time – buy online, pick up in store!

 

September is National Preparedness Month

Advance Auto PartsIf you ask almost anyone if it’s good to be prepared, the answer would be “yes.” And yet, one article from Emergency Management estimates that only 10 percent of people would be prepared to deal with an emergency situation such as an earthquake–meaning that only one in every ten people is prepared for 72 hours of self-sustained living after a disaster.

That’s probably because no one likes to think about emergencies, much less full-blown disasters. Because it’s National Preparedness Month, though, emergency preparedness is more in the news right now, and so more front of mind.

The team at Advance Auto Parts was impressed with the emergency preparedness information provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–and would like to expand upon this sentence: “During an emergency, your local Emergency Management or Emergency Services office will give you information on such things as open shelters and evacuation orders.”

But . . . if you received evacuation orders today, would your car be ready to go?

Hypothetical scenario

Let’s say that it’s been a hectic week at work and your spouse is out of town, so your home responsibilities are much bigger than normal. Because of that, you’ve let minor things go for now–until next week only, when your spouse returns. For example, you didn’t deal with your car’s overdue oil change and you didn’t stop to fill up your gas tank. You had to get to the day care in time and so those tasks, you figure, can wait until tomorrow.

Then, the emergency–no, the disaster–strikes. Let’s say that a fire begins raging out of control in your neighborhood, and you and your children need to get out, now. It’s likely that all gas stations will be closed in the area; and, even if you find one open, can you imagine the line?

Evacuation safety tips

FEMA offers this great advice: “If you have a car, keep a full tank of gas in it if an evacuation seems likely. Keep a half tank of gas in it at all times in case of an unexpected need to evacuate. Gas stations may be closed during emergencies and unable to pump gas during power outages. Plan to take one car per family to reduce congestion and delay.”

Other evacuation safety tips from Advance Auto Parts include keeping the following items in your car at all times:

  • An emergency kit containing such things as:
    • First aid items
    • Cell phone chargers that work in your car
    • Fire extinguisher
    • Flares
    • Basic tools
    • Jumper cables
    • Flashlight and batteries
    • Battery powered radio and batteries
    • Clean cloths
    • Blankets
    • Water
    • Cat litter to gain traction
    • Loose change for any tolls you’d need to pay or vending machines that you can access after you leave the immediate danger zone

If you have a baby, make it a practice to keep a car seat in each vehicle at all times and to include powdered formula, jars of baby food and a spoon in your emergency kit, along with diapers.

If you aren’t already, get into the habit of regular car maintenance so that, if you need to evacuate in a hurry, your car is a reliable form of transportation.

What emergency preparedness or evacuation tips can you share? Leave a comment below!

 

Editor’s note: Be sure to visit Advance Auto Parts for a wide selection of roadside assistance kits and other essentials.

 

Photo courtesy of Ready.gov.

Online buying patterns and tips

Advance Auto PartsShopping on the Internet has become a routine part of life for many people, and not just during the holidays. According to an infographic based on the June 2010 Nelson Global Consumer Report:

  • 74% of the population uses the Internet
  • 66% of Internet users purchase products and services online
  • In 2010, Americans spent $186 billion online

These online shopping statistics indicate even more activity in the future, with online buying projected to reach $250 billion by 2014.

More online shopping statistics

These statistics are from the Global Online Shopper Report:

  • Globally, 69% of online shoppers use credit cards to complete their transactions
  • Globally, shoppers spend about five hours per months on online buying transactions
  • And, just for fun: 95% of people are physically in their homes when making an Internet-based purchase, more specifically:
    • 54% are in the living room
    • 43% are in the bedroom
    • 3% are in the bathroom

Read the full report for even more info.

Online auto parts shopping tips

If you’re new to shopping on the Internet–or even if you aren’t–then you may find these online auto parts shopping tips to be helpful:

  • Use the Advance Auto Parts live chat feature when ordering parts and tools. This free service is available seven days a week, and representatives can answer your questions and guide your purchases so you get the right parts the first time.
  • If you need your auto parts on the same day, you can choose the convenient in-store pickup option and pick up your parts at the Advance Auto Parts store nearest you. You can even pick up one part of your order at the store closest to your home, another part at the store closest to your office and so forth if that’s what you indicate during your purchase.  Lots of flexibility!
  • You can also return or exchange items purchased online at an Advance Auto Parts store.

See you online!

 

Editor’s note: Don’t forget to check out the deals happening at Advance Auto Parts…there’s always one going on!

Name That Part revealed – Power Grid

If you guessed that this week’s part was a “Power Grid” for a car battery, you are correct!

For all your car and truck battery needs, visit Advance Auto Parts.

We’ll see you on Facebook next Monday for another round of Name That Part!

Battery Power Grid

Battery Power Grid

Show what you know by playing Name That Part at the Advance Auto Parts Facebook page every Monday. How it works: we post a shot of an auto part, and you submit your best guess for a chance to win the admiration of DIY’ers across the globe.

If you’re a “pinner” on Pinterest, follow our Advance Auto Parts Pinterest boards!
Editor’s note: Visit Advance Auto Parts to get those projects kicked into higher gear before summer ends! Save time – buy online, pick up in store!

 

Advance Author Series: Diane Flynn Keith and CARSCHOOLING

 

Diane Flynn Keith“Mom, are we there yet?”

“I’m thirsty. I don’t want water. When can we get more juice?”

“How long until we find a bathroom? I really gotta go.”

“Mom . . . are we there yet???”

 

 Anyone who has traveled a long distance with a child in the car can relate to some or all of the statements above. The good news, though, is that it doesn’t have to be like this. In fact, the car rides to and from great places can be as rewarding as the trip destination itself. Honest!

Diane Flynn Keith’s book, Carschooling: Over 350 Entertaining Games & Activities to Turn Travel Time Into Learning Time, shares ways to make the most of your miles and to turn a potentially anxiety-provoking car ride into a time of fun exploration with your children. For example, if you have a child who is fascinated with stuff that’s a little yucky, have him or her monitor the bugs that splat on the windshield–and then report on what the bug had for its last meal. How, you wonder? Well, if the liquid is green, the meal was vegetarian; black, another bug. If it’s red, that’s not blood; it’s eye pigmentation. A little gross? Sure. An entryway into the world of science, anatomy, medicine and more? Absolutely!

Diane first came up with the idea of carschooling when homeschooling her two young sons.

She would take them to various lessons throughout the week and, with San Francisco, California traffic, she one day realized that they were spending four hours a day, five days a week, in their car. So, what did Diane do? She made the world their classroom.

With something as simple as a magnifying glass, plastic bags, pen and paper, as just one example, the family could explore and record the miracles of nature, from rocks and trees to animals and birds and feathers. They could also explore and record the miracles of themselves, seeing what freckles, blue jeans, hair and leftover French fries look like until the power of a magnifying glass. Keep your field guides in your car, not on your bookshelves, to enrich your experiences even further.

After recognizing how much more her sons learned when learning was fun, Diane began writing a Carschooling column.

This column appeared in a secular magazine that she published, Home Fires: the Journal of Homeschooling. She began asking other parents for ideas they had to entertain and educate the young ones while in the car and their ideas were, according to Diane, “ingenious.”

She compiled the ideas and approached Random House, and her book, Carschooling, was born in 2002. In 2009, she bought the rights to the book back and self published, including on Kindle. Diane has a big platform, world-wide, as a homeschooling mentor, with learning on the road one of her best known specialties.

“Give me an object,” Diane says, “and I will tell you 1,000 fun ways to learn from that object. I’ll show you how to pull a string and see the tapestry of possibilities.”

Each chapter of her book focuses on innovative ways to learn more about a subject, whether it’s math, science, language arts, music, art, foreign language or something else. Ideas go beyond typical car games like Slug Bug and I Spy and will work for any family, not just homeschooling families.

“In a car,” Diane explains, “your family is a captive audience. It’s a perfect place to create heartfelt memories and bind together in the most profound ways. In such close proximity, your children might tell you things they never would otherwise share. You can trigger something within them that allows them to discover that, yes. They can create.”

Editor’s note: We hope you’ve enjoyed our author interview with Diane Flynn Keith. Be sure to watch for more author interviews. In the meantime, visit Advance Auto Parts for quality auto parts and more.

Name That Part revealed – Oil Pump Drive Shaft

If you guessed “Oil Pump Drive Shaft” for this week’s Name That Part challenge, you are correct!

For more information about this Oil Pump Drive Shaft, visit Advance Auto Parts.

We’ll see you on Facebook next Monday for another round of Name That Part!

Oil Pump Drive Shaft

Oil Pump Drive Shaft

Show what you know by playing Name That Part at the Advance Auto Parts Facebook page every Monday. How it works: we post a shot of an auto part, and you submit your best guess for a chance to win the admiration of DIY’ers across the globe.

If you’re a “pinner” on Pinterest, follow our Advance Auto Parts Pinterest boards!
Editor’s note: Visit Advance Auto Parts to get those projects kicked into higher gear before summer ends! Save time – buy online, pick up in store!

 

Summer road trips just aren’t what they used to be…and that’s good!

Advance Auto PartsWhen people think of a summer get-away, they often imagine beautiful sunshine, pristine beaches, a cool drink in the shade. Stuff like that.

The first-ever coast-to-coast road trip, though, (kicked off on May 23, 1903) was anything but relaxing. According to the National Museum of American History and National Geographic, the two travelers – H. Nelson Jackson, a doctor and businessman, and mechanic Sewall K. Crocker – needed to deal with plenty of challenges and car troubles during their 63-day trip (from San Francisco to New York) in a 1903 Winton.

First was the lack of roads. On their trip, fewer than 150 miles of roadway had been constructed–and that was out of a nearly 3,000-mile journey–and bridges didn’t always exist over the waterways. Plus, there were no gas stations so the pair needed to find general stores along the way to buy fuel. And they also needed lots of patience, as their average rate of speed was only four miles per hour.

Then, there was the mud. Lots and lots of mud. In fact, some areas were so bad that Jackson and Crocker sometimes needed to use a block and tackle system to get their vehicle out of the sludge. On the flip side, there was also dust, which got to be so overwhelming that the dog that accompanied them, Bud the bulldog, needed to wear goggles. (The reason the dust was so bad: the men needed to remove the cloth roof of the car to make room for their luggage! That couldn’t have been comfortable on rainy days.)

Their car would break down and, when it did, there were no convenient auto repair shops nearby. Instead, the duo needed to contact the car factory by telegraph and have the factory ship them parts by train. Seriously.

Plus there was the cost, which was a staggering $8,000 for the vehicle, gasoline, hotel rooms, food and the like. According to a calculator provided by a governmental site, $8,000 in the year 1913 would equal $188,238.38 today.

Oh–and do you want to know why they took this trip? Because someone bet them $50 that a car couldn’t complete a coast-to-coast journey. But, on August 1, 1903, Jackson and Crocker won that bet (making the net cost of the trip in today’s dollars only $187,061.89).

More about the Winton

According to Cleveland Historical, the Winton Motor Carriage Company was formed on March 15, 1897 with each individual vehicle made by hand. These were luxury vehicles, with elaborately painted sides, gas lamps, cushy padded seats and more. In a May 1897 test drive, their 40-horsepower vehicle got up to an astonishing 33.64 miles per hour.

In 1898, these cars were in great demand and more than 100 of them sold in that year alone. In fact, this company kept selling cars until 1924, when it simply couldn’t compete with the prices offered by Henry Ford.

Hopefully your own summer road trips will be trouble free.

To help out, here is a car maintenance checklist so you can make sure your vehicle is in the best shape possible before you head out for your vacation.

And, if you end up having car troubles–which we hope you don’t!–you can get the parts you need online or by stopping by one of our 4000 stores, located around the country.

 

Editor’s note: If you’re planning on hitting the road, download this helpful infographic for helpful tips. Also, visit Advance Auto Parts for great deals on quality auto parts, accessories and more.

Name That Part revealed – Water Separator Valve

If you guessed this week’s mystery part as a “Water Separator Valve,” you got it!

For more information about this Water Separator Valve, visit Advance Auto Parts.

We’ll see you on Facebook next Monday for another round of Name That Part!

Water Separator Valve

Water Separator Valve

Show what you know by playing Name That Part at the Advance Auto Parts Facebook page every Monday. How it works: we post a shot of an auto part, and you submit your best guess for a chance to win the admiration of DIY’ers across the globe.

If you’re a “pinner” on Pinterest, follow our Advance Auto Parts Pinterest boards!
Editor’s note: Visit Advance Auto Parts to get those summer projects kicked into higher gear. Save time – buy online, pick up in store!

 

Name That Part revealed – Engine Oil Level Sensor

This week’s mystery part was an “Engine Oil Level Sensor.” Did you get it right? Congratulations if you did! If you didn’t, there’s always next week!

For more information about this Engine Oil Level Sensor, visit Advance Auto Parts.

We’ll see you on Facebook next Monday for another round of Name That Part!

Engine Oil Level Sensor

Engine Oil Level Sensor

Show what you know by playing Name That Part at the Advance Auto Parts Facebook page every Monday. How it works: we post a shot of an auto part, and you submit your best guess for a chance to win the admiration of DIY’ers across the globe.

If you’re a “pinner” on Pinterest, follow our Advance Auto Parts Pinterest boards!
Editor’s note: Visit Advance Auto Parts to get those summer projects kicked into higher gear. Save time – buy online, pick up in store!