Checking in with Lowered Lifestyle – 2 years later

Photo by: Alex White

Photo by: Alex White

If the growth of LoweredLifestyle.com is any indicator of the growth of the lowered car / stance scene, then lowering cars for looks and performance is a trend that’s here to stay.

Advance Auto Parts first met up with Matt Phillips to talk about the stance scene two years ago. Since then, the Lowered Lifestyle Facebook page has grown in popularity to 100k+ likes with 10k+ people engaging with the page every week.

We reached out to Matt again for an update on the lowered car scene, the outstanding growth of his site and what he sees as the next big trend in lowered cars.

“We owe it all to our fans who’ve embraced the scene and made it what it is today,” says Matt. “There’s not a day that goes by that I’m not super impressed with the creativity of people out there. Just when you think you’ve seen it all, someone comes along and raises the bar.”

Photo by: Kendra Aceto

Photo by: Kendra Aceto

“Two years ago we were seeing a lot of perfect offsets and stretched tires. Most of what people were doing was fitting wider wheels to stock-bodied cars. Now we’re seeing motorsport-inspired over-fender kits from companies like Liberty Walk and Rocket Bunny.”

One of the most popular methods of lowering a car involves replacing the stock suspension with adjustable coilovers. However, a lowered car on coils can sometimes be a burden for daily drivers.

Photo by:  Colton Mantolino

Photo by: Colton Mantolino

“Air suspension has come a long way,” says Matt. “Three years ago when I installed air on the Volvo, the system was basically set up for a compromise between ride and handling. The new Air Lift system we just installed on our GTI provides the best of both worlds. It’s competent performance suspension that doesn’t sacrifice ride quality.”

Air suspension allows owners to “air out,” which drops the vehicle to near ground level when parked. “The result is perfect fitment every time with instantaneous adjustability.”

photo by: Mike Raffia

photo by: Mike Raffia

When asked about the future of Lowered Lifestyle and the scene in general, Matt says this.

“It’s an exciting time, for sure. There are options for enthusiasts of virtually any make or model and at virtually any budget level. Great builds aren’t just for those with deep pockets.”

Any parting thoughts, Matt?

“Live low.”

Thanks Matt!

Editor’s note: If your car is lowered and you love it (or not) let us know in the comments below.  And while you’re at it, hit up Advance Auto Parts for the best selection in parts and accessories.

 

Make Your FR-S or BRZ As Fast As It Should Be

Scion FR-s

Scion FR-S

If you’re like me, you probably went crazy a few years ago when you heard the Toyota 86 was about to drop. Known as the Scion FR-S and Subaru BRZ in the States, the hachi-roku (that’s “8-6″ in Japanese, kids) promised a return to the good old days when you could get a cool rear-drive sport coupe for a reasonable price. Of course, hachiroku itself is a reference to the iconic RWD Corolla coupes from the ’80s. With bloodlines like these, Toyota and Subaru couldn’t miss.

But they did. Hard. Because the modern-day hachiroku just doesn’t have enough muscle. The 2.0-liter boxer four under the hood is rated at 200 horsepower (I’ve seen 165 hp at the wheels) and a measly 151 lb-ft of torque. It makes some sporty noises when you wind it out, but there’s no force behind it. The FR-S and BRZ are not fast cars — and the target demographic loves fast cars.

So what’s a power-hungry FR-S or BRZ owner to do? Slap a turbo on it, brah! Here are two great kits that’ll turn your 86 into a monster right quick.

Turbocharging the Scion FR-S or Subaru BRZ

Subaru BRZ

Subaru BRZ

If you’re one of those peeps who want mega aftermarket power, a turbo kit is obviously the way to go. The peak output you get with some of these kits is just explosive. Of course, you’re gonna use more oil, and in general you should be even more vigilant than usual about maintenance with a modified car. But a lot of folks have been running turbo setups on 86s for thousands of miles with no issues. It’s a robust foundation for your build. As a point of entry, check these two kits out.

FA20Club Stage 1 ($3,499) 

FA20Club is one of the big names you see on the hachiroku boards, and for good reason: they pack a lot of value into their kits. This one here is their entry-level setup, which they say is “capable of up to 280whp without fuel mods.” That’s a cool 115-hp gain over stock power at the wheels, and if you think about the power-to-weight ratio that gives you, we’re talking Porsche Cayman territory. Not bad for a few grand.

Dynosty Turbo Build ($17,914) 

Ready to roll up your sleeves? Let’s get serious and quintuple the price of the FA20Club kit with this well-regarded Dynosty setup. If you’re up for it, an easy 400+ whp can be yours, and that puts your hachiroku in rarefied territory indeed. See, these cars in stock form weigh in at about 2,800 pounds, maybe a little less. Now consider the new C7 Corvette, making 460 hp for 3,300 pounds. If you do the math, the 86 actually has a better power-to-weight ratio than the Vette. Maybe spending $45 grand or so on a Japanese sport coupe isn’t so silly after all.

Let’s Hit The Street

Are you sold on turbocharging as the answer? Anyone want to speak up for superchargers? Let me know in the comments you guys.

Editor’s note: Count on Advance Auto Parts for a wide selection of performance parts and accessories. Get back to the garage fast—buy online, pick up in-store in 30 minutes.

Loading Your ATV for Transport — a Cautionary Tale

Quad ATVMy brother-in-law almost killed himself a short while back. How he escaped serious injury I don’t know, but he’s lucky he did. He’s a big-time turkey hunter and was getting his gear ready in preparation for being in the woods before dawn the next morning, for the first day of spring gobbler season. His final task was loading his ATV (you might call it a quad) into the bed of his pickup.

As he drove up the two short loading ramps he had made, his son called out to him. Thinking that the ATV ramps weren’t aligned or something was wrong, he hit the brakes, and then the throttle and the ATV flipped over backwards on him and they both landed on the ground. Luckily he was okay. He said it happened so fast, he still isn’t exactly sure what he did…and he still seems to be seeing stars.

I see lots of people around here hauling lawn tractors and ATVs in their pickup beds, particularly during deer and turkey seasons. I’ve even hauled my own a time or two, but am fortunate to have a trailer that’s low to the ground – and a set of loading ramps.

Given his accident, and how many other similar accidents happen – many of which have “bad idea” written all over them – I got to thinking about the safest way to load an ATV or tractor into a pickup bed, and learned a few things in the process. Here’s my unofficial list of how to “do it right” and avoid potential death, injury, property damage, or humiliation. If you have some tips or pointers, I’d love to hear those too.

1. Get ATV ramps – they are designed specifically for this purpose, unlike the scraps of lumber and cinderblocks lying around your garage. They make these aluminum ramps for a reason – safety. They’ll also make your loading and unloading a lot easier and less scary.

2. Make sure the loading ramps are securely fastened to the loading platform. Many of the accidents I’ve seen occur as the ATV nears the top of the ramps. The torque from the rear drive tire grabs the unsecured ramp and kicks it out, leaving only three wheels on the surface. You know what happens next.

3. Get aluminum ramps or a ramp kit with ramps using dimensional lumber that are long enough to reduce the angle of ascent or descent. ATV ramps that are too short, coupled with today’s truck beds that are higher off the ground, are a recipe for disaster because the incline you’re driving up or down is too steep, increasing the likelihood of a flip over. Consider ramp extensions instead. Also look for a spot from which to load that naturally reduces the angle because of the terrain – i.e. parking the truck in a dip and using the adjacent sloping terrain on which to place the ramps

4. Avoid sudden starts or stops, particularly midway through the loading or unloading process. The sudden weight transfer can cause the ATV to flip over.

5. Wear your helmet.

6. Know the weight of what you’re loading. This is important because wood or aluminum ramps are designed to safely hold only a certain amount of weight. Same goes for your truck’s tailgate.

Once your ATV or tractor is safely tucked in the truck bed, secure it well, to avoid watching it bounce away down the road in your rearview mirror. And, make sure it’s not pressing against the truck cab’s back window in case you stop short.

Finally, if you’re serious about hauling your ATV – and boat – and still having room left in the bed to store your gear, then check this loading system out. I didn’t even know it existed but think it’s a great idea.

Editor’s note: From ATV loading ramps to parts that keep your quad running right, Advance Auto Parts has what your ATV needs. Buy online, pick up in store.

 

 

 

 

Cleveland vs. Detroit: a race to Motor City

1899_Winton

Photo credit: Crawford Auto Aviation Collection at the Western Reserve Historical Society.

Today, the winner is clear: Henry Ford in Detroit, Michigan. But, in the early days of automobile manufacturing, the answer wasn’t so obvious – and, in fact, Alexander Winton and Cleveland, Ohio as the Motor City had the early edge.

A step back in time

In March 1897, Scottish immigrant Alexander Winton incorporated Winton Motor Car Company in Cleveland. In May 1897, Winton’s vehicle surged to new heights as it traveled 33.64 miles per hour around a Cleveland horse track. Even after this dazzling demonstration of power, though, people still doubted the durability of the automobile and Winton needed to find a way to convince them.

Reliability Run #1

A showman at heart, Winton decided to tackle a significant challenge to draw attention to his vehicle. On July 28, 1897, Winton and an employee left Cleveland for New York City, traveling 700 miles to prove the reliability of his vehicle. He arrived safely on August 7, after 78 hours and 43 hours of driving time. He didn’t get as much attention as he’d wanted, which was disappointing, but he stayed focused and created four more custom-built motor cars.

On March 24, 1898, he sold one of his vehicles – which might not sound like a big deal, except it was the first “American-made standard-model gasoline automobile” ever sold. He sold it to Robert Allison of Port Carbon, Pennsylvania for the astonishing sum of $1,000 (nearly $28,000 today) after Allison saw a Winton ad in Scientific American. That year, more than 100 Wintons were sold, making his company the largest manufacturer of gas-powered automobiles in the nation.

Reliability Run #2

On May 22, 1899, Winton began a five-day trip to New York, this time with a journalist who’d worked for the Plain Dealer in Cleveland before fighting in the Spanish American War, a man named Charles Shanks. A newspaper article predicted that “the automobile will doubtless become the most convenient mode of transport during the 20th century. The Plain Dealer is endeavoring to demonstrate the entire feasibility of this mode of locomotion.”

This trip generated the publicity Winton craved and boosted sales, with Winton selling 21 more vehicles during the rest of 1899. As for Shanks, he coined the term “automobile” on this journey, which is his lasting legacy.

Photo credit: Crawford Auto-Aviation Museum.

Photo credit: Crawford Auto Aviation Collection at the Western Reserve Historical Society.

Re-enactment: the 1997 Winton Centennial

In retrospect, it’s hard to imagine what a big adventure these Cleveland-to-New-York trips really were. But, to get somewhat of a sense, Advance Auto Parts talked to journalist Chris Jensen who, in 1997, participated in a re-enactment of the trip. At the time, Chris wrote for the Plain Dealer, the newspaper that sponsored the second reliability run in 1899. He recorded his 1997 adventures in that newspaper as he traveled to New York in an 1899 Winton.

Only three known 1899 Wintons exist today and Chris rode in one now belonging to the Frederick C. Crawford Auto Aviation Collection at the Western Reserve Historical Society in Cleveland. The trip was reported in a series of articles in the Plain Dealer. He was the passenger in a vehicle driven by Charles “Charlie” F. Wake, one of Winton’s great-grandsons.

In the re-enactment, 13 other Wintons traveled alongside Chris’s vehicle, the newest being the 1922 model. “This showed how quickly automobiles evolved,” he says, “from the little putt-putt that we were in to Wintons that looked like real cars.”

The wheelbase of the 1899 Winton was only 69 inches, with an overall length of 104 inches. “That makes a Toyota Tercel,” Chris pointed out in an article, “with a 94-inch wheelbase and an overall length of 162 inches seem like a stretch limo.”

The vehicle boasted 8 horsepower and had a one-cylinder, 117-cubic-inch engine that was “banging away and it sounds like the world’s loudest smoker’s cough.”

During the trip, Chris and Charlie were perched up high on the tiny two-seater, on a tufted bench-like seat. Because the top of the vehicle didn’t offer any real protection, the men didn’t use it. “So, there was nothing between me and anything else, including the road,” Chris recalls. “When it rained, I got really, really wet.”

But, there was an upside. “Because we were going at a low speed,” Chris shares with Advance Auto parts, “at 15 to 20 miles per hour, I got to look closely at what was around me instead of zooming past. I got a new appreciation for the hills and how long it took to go both up and down.”

“Going downhill,” he adds, “was pretty interesting because there were basically no brakes. People have asked me, ‘If you were only going 15 miles per hour, what could go wrong?’ and the reality is that, with no real brakes and no seat belts, there is a lot that could go wrong. Picture yourself flying through the air at 15 to 20 miles per hour and crashing into a telephone pole.”

Fortunately, no such accidents happened during the re-enactment. “But,” Chris points out, “we traveled on good roads. Try to imagine people traveling along in mud and rocks and facing other challenges. Plus, the maps weren’t great and it wasn’t always clear, in the 1890s, where you were going. And, if they broke down, who was there to help with repairs?”

Any time the vehicle needed re-started, it needed cranked. “It took a fair amount of effort,” Chris says. “And, as you were driving, you needed to keep pouring oil into it, to keep the car moving along. The oil would drop out onto the ground as you went.” Where the oil was supposed to go: into three troughs that had tubes designed to drip the oil into the transmission, the engine and the differential. The steering happened via a tiller attached to the front wheels, a somewhat scary set-up. As for turning signals, brake lights and headlights, they didn’t exist.

Putting all into perspective

In spite of all of the modern devices that either didn’t yet exist or were sub-standard in the century vehicles from the 1890s and early 20th century, the Winton was the premiere choice of its day, the most powerful, the most technically advanced. Alexander Winton was king of the mountain, with Henry Ford someone whom Winton declined to hire in 1899 when given the chance.

In 1901, when several members of the wealthy Vanderbilt family chose to buy automobiles, they selected Winton vehicles. Winton, flush with his success, built a factory on the west side of Cleveland, at a time when most people building automobiles did so in their personal barns or garages.

Winton began competing in races, with his vehicles usually winning. In 1903, when Dr. Horatio Nelson Jackson made the first-ever cross-country drive, he did so in a Winton. When Alice Ramsey became the first woman to drive cross country, she also chose a Winton.

A change is in the air

Although Wintons received praise, one early customer reportedly wasn’t impressed. When James Ward Packard complained about his new vehicle, Winton allegedly challenged him to do better, the result ultimately becoming the Packard automobile company.

Then there was the race of October 10, 1901.

Winton entered this race as the man to beat – with the automobile to beat. It’s unlikely that he worried too much about one of his competitors: Henry Ford. For the most part, Ford was known as the man who’d founded the floundering Detroit Automobile Company on August 5, 1899 – a company that failed on November 20, 1901 after building just 12 vehicles.

However, Winton’s automobile experienced mechanical difficulties at the 8-mile mark of this 10-mile race and Ford passed him up to win. After Ford’s win, people began ponying up for his next venture, the Henry Ford Company (founded on November 3, 1901, apparently in anticipation of the Detroit Automobile Company closing).

The next year, Winton was determined to beat Ford in a race. After all, the 1902 Winton Bullet reached speeds of 70 miles per hour, the unofficial land record. And, yet, Ford’s driver Barney Oldfield won the race – while Ford suffered another loss with the collapse of the Henry Ford Company on August 22, 1902. With funds in part raised from Oldfield’s win, Ford decided to finance a third automobile company: the Ford Motor Company.

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA - 1968: shows Henry Ford (1863-1947)Henry Ford surges ahead

Although Winton continued to build vehicles until 1924, his business slowly declined while Ford revolutionized manufacturing:

  • In 1908, Ford came out with the affordable “Model T” or “Tin Lizzy” that made automobile buying possible for the middle class
  • In the fall of 1913, Ford began operation of the world’s first moving assembly line for automobiles
  • On January 5, 1914, Ford began paying his workers $5 per day, more than double the previous rate – and more than double what any other automobile company was paying. Job seekers flocked to become part of Ford Motor Company.

Derek E. Moore, the curator of transportation history at the Western Reserve Historical Society, points out that “Cleveland companies continued to manufacture higher quality automobiles, but they were higher priced and, so, a limited market. Therefore, fewer people bought from Cleveland than Detroit.”

As a point of comparison, in 1924:

  • 2 million Fords were manufactured, with prices ranging from $295 ($4,041 in today’s dollars) to $685 ($9,384 in today’s dollars)
  • Winton’s least expensive model cost $2,295 (comparable to $31,438); this is the last year of Winton’s automobile production and we know that, in 1922, he made only 690 vehicles

Interestingly enough, Derek says that Ford built his first assembly plant for the Model T, outside of Detroit, in Cleveland where the Cleveland Institute of Art is currently housed. “Ford would ship components to Cleveland, knowing that it was easier and cheaper to ship parts than fully built automobiles, and then the vehicles could be sold in the Cleveland area.”

You already know the rest of the story. Although Cleveland continued to play a significant role in automobile manufacturing and assembly, the title of Motor City ultimately went to Detroit, with its king named Henry Ford.

Car Parts, Boat Parts and ATVs – more in common than you realize

Boat engineIf I met him, I don’t think I’d like Murphy simply because I really dislike his law. Whatever can go wrong will go wrong, and more often than not on my day off when I have something planned that I’ve been looking forward to for a long time.

This isn’t a recent phenomenon for me either. But the good news is that as my mechanical knowledge grew, I figured out quickly how to circumvent his law and salvage my day – most of the time – when it comes to the motorized vehicles causing me problems and standing in the way of my fun.

The solution I learned about when I was younger, albeit the hard way, is that many automotive parts can serve double duty as replacement parts for recreational vehicles. I say I learned it the hard way because it only came after several outings were ruined by a boat motor that had wouldn’t start because it needed a marine battery, my grandfather’s old Ford tractor that wouldn’t start thanks to a temperamental starter, and a dirt bike that quit when the motorcycle battery failed.

I suspect a lot of people were like me when I was first getting my hands dirty taking things apart to figure out how they work, and needing more than a little help from dad putting them back together. I just didn’t realize that some parts, like marine batteries, were interchangeable. The thought never crossed my mind until one weekend when a bunch of my high school buddies and I were at my grandfather’s cabin for the weekend, fishing and riding four-wheelers and dirt bikes. I was about half a mile from the cabin when the dirt bike I was riding refused to restart thanks to a bad motorcycle battery. Knowing there weren’t any ATV or specialty power sports parts suppliers nearby, I figured my bike would have to be parked for the weekend. Only after I pushed it home on the gravel road that was, thankfully, mostly downhill, did my grandfather tell me that I could get the battery I needed at just about any place that sold auto parts.

The same goes for a lot of other power sports machines and their parts. Here are some of the more common parts and problems that might get in the way of your fun, and how to solve them.

1. Batteries – most auto parts stores carry a wide range of batteries that fit boats, ATVs, dirt bikes, jet skis, snowmobiles and even golf carts. Make sure you bring in the old marine battery or whatever type it is and get it tested first to confirm that’s the problem, to get the right replacement size, and to avoid the core charge.

2. Spark plugs and wires – this is another category that you don’t have to rely on a specialty parts supplier for. Even if you think that glow plugs for a Kubota B20 diesel tractor or plugs for a Yamaha Tt-R225 dirt bike are uncommon and only available through a dealer, think again and try your local auto parts supplier first.

3. Boats – many of the parts on inboard boat motors are interchangeable with car and truck engine parts simply because many boat manufacturers utilize engines made by vehicle manufacturers. For example, the 4.3 liter GM V-6 that’s in your 2000 Glastron boat can use a lot of the same 4.3 V6 GM motor parts that are available at an auto parts store, such as Advance. Wires, ignition coils, air and oil filters, distributor caps and distributor rotors and marine batteries –all available and pretty much interchangeable, even when a marine parts specialty supplier isn’t nearby.

Of course, a little preventive maintenance before you hit the trail or water can help you avoid many of these problems in the first place. But if they do crop up, you now know that many of these parts are readily available somewhere other than just a specialty power sports provider.

Editor’s note: Advance Auto Parts carries the powersport batteries you need, including ones for motorcycles, boats, ATV’s, tractors, golf carts and snowmobiles.  Buy online, pick up in store.

 

 

 

Diagnostic Tips When Air Conditioning Isn’t Working

Cool inviting blue waterWhen summertime hits, repairs to your car’s A/C system get moved up the to-do list – fast. Here are some tips to guide you through the diagnostic process, along with information about when to replace the A/C compressor or recharge the A/C system.

Not sure why your air conditioning isn’t working? Try this test first to see if the clutch is engaging the A/C compressor:

• Turn on your A/C and fans to the max setting.
• Is the clutch engaging?

If not, use a voltmeter to see if the compressor is receiving voltage.

• If there is voltage, the clutch may be bad. Replacement of the clutch and/or compressor may be necessary.
• If there is no voltage, there may not be sufficient refrigerant in the system to engage the low pressure cut off switch that cycles the compressor.

If it seems likely that there isn’t enough refrigerant in the system, the typical culprit is a leak. Next steps include:

• Use a manifold gauge to check the high and low side pressures in the system.

Are they set within the recommended ranges provided in your owner’s/repair manual?

• Check the following for a tight and secure fit:

o   Front seal of compressor

o   All system fittings

o   Hose manifolds on compressor

o   All system hose crimps

o   Schrader valves

o   O-rings found on compressor pressure switches

• Use a UV A/C leak detector kit to find leaks, including in the condenser and evaporator.

Man looking at a smoking engine in his carImportant note

If you need to replace your A/C compressor, you will also need to replace your:

• Accumulator and/or dryer
• Expansion device

You will also want to conduct a full flush of the system for optimal performance. Some vehicles also require a replacement of the condenser to eliminate all debris from the A/C system.

Car air conditioning recharging

The EPA provides detailed information about the process and regulations. You can read them in full or use the summary we’ve provided below.

When recharging, there are two main options:

1)   Top off with refrigerant

2)   Empty/evacuate the system and recharge/refill the system

Although each can be effective, they are both temporary fixes if any A/C leaks still exist. And, if you have an older vehicle, what’s leaking is CFC-12 (Freon), an expensive refrigerant that is no longer manufactured in the United States because of concerns about the ozone layer. The cost of replacing CFC-12 will make it more economical, in most cases, to fix any leaks first.

Top-off versus evacuation and recharge

A top-off is cheaper, faster and simpler. However, any impurities in the refrigerant remain unless you choose the recharge process, which involves:

  • Removing any remaining refrigerant
  • Purifying the refrigerant using recycling equipment, recharging it into the vehicle and then topping if off, as necessary

Plus, the recharging allows you to be more precise. When topping off refrigerant, you can determine the optimal amount (say, 2.2 pounds) by looking in your owner’s manual. However, there is no precise way to know how much refrigerant is currently in a vehicle, making topping off an estimate at best. If the A/C system is accidentally overcharged, newer cars usually have a feature that causes the system to shut down in hot weather. With a recharge, you can be precise.

toolsTo find a leak

If only a small amount of refrigerant appears to be left, you will need to add up to a few ounces. If the refrigerant has less pressure than 50 pounds per square inch, the EPA says more refrigerant is needed.  (Note that at least 1 to 1.5 pounds of refrigerant is needed to test cooling capabilities.) The EPA recommends the use of an electronic leak detector that is Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J1627 certified.

It is possible to have pinpoint-sized leaks that are very difficult to find, even with the best equipment. These tiny leaks cause slow leakage but the A/C system may seem to lose its cooling capabilities virtually all at once. If so, it’s likely that your vehicle has a system that shuts off once refrigerant drops below a certain level.

The EPA does not require that refrigerant be removed and cleaned before car air conditioning recharging takes place. To get more information, call 800-296-1996. The EPA also does not require that leak repairs be done before refrigerant is added, although states and/or localities can require this.

State-level agencies

Here are listings of state-level environmental agencies in alphabetical order. You can search the appropriate agency to find information for your state and/or contact them to ask them a specific question.

Another useful tool is the Gateway to State Resource Locators, where you can narrow your questions down by broad type and then enter your zip code and further filter down the type of information you need.

Streamlined option

If you decide to just add refrigerant, A/C Pro is a solution to consider. With this product, you simply locate the low-pressure connection point and use the A/C Pro gauge to measure the system’s pressure. If low, you can refill by pulling the trigger on the product’s nozzle and monitor pressure via their pressure gauge device, making sure that you don’t overfill. Convenient features include the reusable trigger and the extra-long (24-inch) hose. The product also contains a sealant that helps stop leaks on hoses, gaskets and o-rings.

Editor’s note: Visit Advance Auto Parts for a wide selection of A/C parts and more. Get back to the garage fast—buy online, pick up in-store in just 30 minutes!

Does Dad like cars? Don’t let him miss this road trip!

Ford Model TGrab Dad and head out to Motor Muster this weekend for Father’s Day!

With winter in the rearview, it’s time to get behind the wheel and just drive! So, put June 14-15 on your calendar and “Dearborn, Michigan” in your GPS, and head for the Motor Muster event at Greenfield Village:

“Gearheads, diehard car lovers, auto geeks—this is your weekend at Greenfield Village.

Make your way to a vintage auto enthusiast’s dream destination: From glamorous classics of the 1930s to brawny muscle cars of the 1970s, Greenfield Village hosts more than 500 gleaming examples.

Motor Muster celebrates one of the grandest and most innovative eras of American automotive history—1933-1976. For the entire weekend, the streets and lawns of Greenfield Village will be filled with hundreds of classic cars, vintage trucks, motorcycles, military vehicles, bicycles—even a fire engine or two. They’ll all be here, from brawny muscle cars to the straight-out-of-the-showroom cars you and your parents grew up with. Stroll the grounds and meet the owners who lavish attention on these wonders of rolling history. There’s the Saturday night cruise, too, and a live early 1960s dance show with dancing in the streets ’til 9pm. A one-of-a-kind event for cars and the people who love them.”

Don’t leave Greenfield Village without visiting Thomas Edison’s laboratory or the bicycle shop where the Wright Brothers invented the airplane. Both of these buildings were taken apart and brought to Greenfield Village where they were reconstructed.

While you’re there

Adjacent to Greenfield Village is the Henry Ford Museum, which is the home of Driving America: the World’s Premier Automotive Exhibition. Historic vehicles in this exhibition range from Henry Ford’s first vehicle (the 1896 Quadricycle) to the limousine that President John F. Kennedy rode when he was assassinated. The museum contains touchscreens throughout so you can discover more about the vehicles, a smart card so you can “compile and transfer your own digital collection for online viewing later” and a test that determines the best car for your personality.The Henry Ford

From May 17-August 17, you can see a special exhibit on loan from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, titled “Women Who Rock: Vision, Passion, Power.” The Henry Ford Museum is also planning a $15 million exhibit, called Racing in America, and you can discover more about this grassroots effort. The museum is also the departure point for the Ford Rouge Factory tour, a 1917 factory that at one time employed 100,000 workers.

Located next door to the Henry Ford Museum is the Automotive Hall of Fame, where people who have contributed to the industry are honored. You’ll also see a 65-long mural of historic auto-related people and moments, a full-sized replica of the first gasoline-powered car and more.

Drive a dozen more miles

And you’ll find yourself in Detroit, at the original Ford assembly plant, now known as the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant National Historic Landmark. You can tour this 1904 factory where Henry Ford designed the Model T and built the first 12,000 of the Tin Lizzies before the advent of Ford’s moving assembly line. You can see early Ford vehicles, as well.

Greenfield VillageWhen this plant first opened, it took workers 12 hours to build one car, which sold for $850. By the time this plant closed (replaced by the much larger and more well-known Highland Park Model T plant, where 12 million Tin Lizzies were built), assembly time plunged to 12 minutes and, the cost, to $260. Work days dropped at Ford from ten hours to eight hours and wages skyrocketed from 30 cents an hour to $5 a day.

If you find yourself on I-94 while in Detroit, near the Metro Airport, you’ll probably notice the Uniroyal Giant Tire that was originally created as a Ferris wheel attraction for the World Fair, held in New York in 1964 and 1965. Ninety-six people could fit into the wheel at the fair and it needed a 100-horsepower motor to operate. Altogether, more than one million people rode in this tire before it became a stationary landmark. In 1994, neon lighting was added to the tire, along with a new hubcap. In 2003, Uniroyal invested an incredible $1 million to renovate its well-known landmark.

What would you recommend for a Dearborn/Detroit road trip? Leave your recommendations in the comments below.

Editor’s note: Dad, if you’re reading this, it’s time to drop some serious hints! Advance Auto Parts can help with great deals on premium parts, tools, accessories and more. Buy online, pick up in store–in 30 minutes!

People and Their Cars video

Car videoHere at the DIY Garage, we revel in finding and sharing cool car content. Check out this informative video that showcases some telling stats on America’s enduring love for its automobiles.

 

Check it out:

 

According to CJ Pony Parts, who created the video:

The average American driver spends 600 hours per year behind the wheel. That’s a significant chunk of our lives – in total, we’ll spend 5 years driving in our lifetimes – and it has caused many of us to grow emotionally attached to these vehicles. Cars do more than just get us from point A to point B; they get us there safely, sometimes in style, and we get to know all of their little quirks and features.

Because of this, a quarter of us name our cars, and even if we don’t actually attach a name to the vehicle we drive, 40% of us attach a personality to it. We even assign our cars a gender – 32% of the cars on the road are “female,” while 16% are “male.”

Maybe this affection towards the vehicles we drive explains why we spend so much money on them. We spend, on average, 14.5% of our income on car parts and service, and that doesn’t include the $1560 we spend per year on fuel. Still, for a means of transportation that will take us 798,000 miles over the course of a lifetime.

Review: the 2014 Infiniti Q50 Hybrid

2014 Infinity Q50 Hybrid 1Our resident Gearhead takes this hotly tipped hybrid for a spin.

Given my loyalty to old-fashioned muscle cars, you might think that “Hybrid” is a dirty word in these parts. But you’d be wrong. Tell you what, I love the idea of an extra electric motor that helps the gas engine do its job. If you design it right, that electric motor will really kick in at low speeds to give you more torque, and it’ll help you when you’re merging and passing, too. Kind of like a modern turbocharged engine without the lag.

Trouble is, most hybrids are all about fuel economy, which means they pretty much hate fun. But I’ve finally found one that’s a little different, and I’m smitten. Let me tell you a few things about my new crush — it’s called the 2014 Infiniti Q50 Hybrid.

1. It’s Fast

And I mean fast. With its 3.5-liter V6 hybrid system, this thing cranks out 360 horsepower! That’s even more than the regular non-hybrid Q50, which stops at 328. It’s not just about the power, either, because this hybrid makes boatloads of low-end torque. It’s like an old big-block V8 the way it rears back and puts down the hammer from a stop. Like I said, when you add an electric motor to the mix, it can give you a real wallop during acceleration. Infiniti gets that. For the record, the Q50 Hybrid will do 0-60 in 4.9 seconds, or almost half a second quicker than the non-hybrid car.2014 Infinity Q50 Hybrid 2

2. It Drives Like a Champ

One thing about hybrids is that they’ve got big old battery packs to run those electric motors, and you’ve got to put that heavy thing somewhere. If you’re not careful, the extra weight can mess up the balance of the car. But Infiniti has positioned the Q50 Hybrid’s battery pack such that it adds a little rearward weight bias without going crazy. The result, if you ask me, is even better balance than the regular Q50. Going around corners in the Q50 Hybrid, I felt like I was driving an honest-to-goodness sport sedan. It just hunkers down and goes, with no understeer and not much body roll, either. Who ever heard of a hybrid that’s this fun to drive?

3. Its Fuel Economy is Amazing

Quick, name a midsize, five-passenger sedan that hits 60 mph in under 5 seconds and gets 31 mpg combined. Let me emphasize the “combined” part, because that’s what the EPA says you can expect for each tank as a weighted average of city (29 mpg) and highway (36 mpg) driving. Most cars with this much speed don’t even break 30 mpg on the highway cycle, and they’re way down in the 20s or even teens for city driving. That’s the other thing about a hybrid car’s electric motor — it takes a load off the gas engine in normal driving, and that means you need less gas to get around.

2014 Infinity Q50 Hybrid 4Sign This Gearhead Up

My test car came in at a shade over $46,000. That’s actually pretty reasonable when you consider that the Q50 Hybrid is a full-on luxury car with leather, navigation, Bose audio, dual electronics displays, you name it. You could easily pay more than twice as much for a Porsche Panamera hybrid that goes 0-60 in 5.2 seconds and only gets 25 mpg combined. I never thought I’d be saying this about a hybrid, but I would really and truly like to own this 2014 Infiniti Q50 Hybrid sedan.

Am I crazy? Have you ever driven a hybrid that made you fall in love? Tell us your story in the comments.

 

Editor’s note: Whether you drive a hot new hybrid or a weathered old gas-guzzler, count on Advance Auto Parts for the best in parts—and even better values.

The Lotus Exige S, plus car news from around the web

Photo credit: Lotus Cars

Photo credit: Lotus Cars

The Lotus Exige S Roadster is an exceedingly sweet looking performance car, going from 0-100 in just 8.5 seconds–comparable to a Porsche 911 GT3. So, it’s easy to imagine how amazing you’d look as you slip into the car and take off, leaving mere mortals in the dust…or, how you’d come to a halt and smoothly exit the car in front of adoring fans.

Then, there’s the reality, as in this video we recently unearthed.

If you didn’t get a chance to attend the New York Auto Show, you have to take a look at this slideshow of 10 incredible cars. They range from an ordinary Ford Gran Torino transformed into a 3-D metal piece of art to the new Corvette, and from a 2015 Dodge Challenger with a 1971-throwback design to a Jaguar F Type sports car with 550 hp and 0-60 in just four seconds.

Here, C-Net editors pick their favorites from the show:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b1ZyI6ziPKw

AutoNews.com reports that one of the hottest collectible cars for 2015 is likely to be the 50 Year Limited Edition Mustang. That’s because only 1,964 cars will be manufactured, in honor of the year (1964) that the car debuted. Because there are 3,200 Ford dealers, not every dealership will get even one of these beauties. The price has not yet been announced, although CarAndDriver.com has revealed info about the option pricing.

Meanwhile, AutoBlog.com highlights the classic Ferrari 250 GTO. Only 36 of these cars were ever built and it may be the most expensive vehicle ever sold (allegedly at $52 million in 2013). This particular car was raced multiple times by Phil Hill and won races at Daytona and Nassau, in large part because of its 300 hp, 3.0-liter V-12 engine.

Now, the update

Back in 2013, we delivered predictions that self-driving cars would be a hot news topic–and now the story of the self-driving car is all over the Internet, thanks to a post by Google.

And, when we say all over the Internet, that’s just what we mean. For more info on the topic, here are just a percentage of the articles now available:

Editor’s note: What car news have you stumbled upon? Let us know in the comments below. And while you’re checking things out, head on over to Advance Auto Parts, where there’s always a great savings deal to be had.