Weather Stripping: Not Just for Your Home

weather stripping

Source | Juha Lakaniemi/Unsplash

Your vehicle’s weather stripping is like the defensive lineman of a football team—an important player but not often seen on the highlight reel. Just as with your home, your car’s weather stripping is there to keep the elements out and provide a quiet and comfortable environment. And like that overlooked lineman, weather stripping is often only considered when it’s not doing its job. Here’s how we’d recommend taking care of it.

How Weather Stripping Works

Weather stripping’s two most common uses are as window seals and door seals. Made of rubber compounds, it’s meant to keep out water, noisy wind, and the cold. That satisfying thud when you close the door of a new car comes courtesy of weather stripping, and so does that nice conversation you’re able to have at 75 mph.

When You Should Replace Weather Stripping

The best way to tell if you should inspect the window and door seals is to make use of a few of your five senses.

  • Can’t hear a word your passengers are saying or have to blast the radio just to hear the music? It’s probably time to put a stop to wind noise in your car.
  • If you’re getting wet in the car wash, you probably need some car window seal repair.
  • If the heater or A/C isn’t doing the trick (and you’ve ruled out any HVAC problems), you’ll want to check the weather stripping.
  • Look for damaged weather stripping. If wind noise is the problem, inspect your door seals for tears or loose-fitting sections that have detached themselves from the door. The same can be said for windshield rubber seal repair.

How To Install Weather Stripping

Here are a few easy steps to fix the issue:

  • Remove the old weather stripping and clean the surface: Weather stripping is glued in place with an adhesive. Remove the old weather stripping. Then use a good solvent, like brake cleaner, to clean off the old glue. Your replacement weather stripping will need a good clean surface to adhere to if you want it to last a long time.
  • Use weather-stripping adhesive to apply the new seals: Replacement weather stripping is easy to find. While shopping, pick up a can of brake cleaner, some silicone spray, and weather-stripping adhesive. Once your surface is clean, use the weather-stripping adhesive and place a small bead along both sides of the inside of the gasket. Inevitably, you’ll get some adhesive that will ooze out. Clean that up with brake cleaner too—just make sure you do it before it dries.
  • Follow with silicone: Once the new weather stripping is in place, give it a quick coating of silicone spray. This helps keep the weather stripping from freezing when it gets cold and wet. Getting frozen out of your car is a real drag.

Maintaining Your Weather Stripping

Now that you’ve got new weather stripping in your car, you’ll want to take good care of it. Those big linemen need a good pat on the back, too, every now and again. Maintenance is simple.

  • If it’s really dry and hot where you live, try to park in the shade or in a garage as much as possible. Heat and direct sunlight will dry out the seals quickly, and they’ll become hard and brittle.
  • In more humid climates where moisture is an issue, moss can accumulate on your weather stripping. Ensure a tighter seal by keeping your weather stripping free from foreign objects.
  • When washing your car, take care to use a towel and wipe the areas between your door and weather stripping. Keeping it clean and dry will help prevent wear and tear.

Have you prepped your car for extreme temps? Let us know your weather-stripping battle stories.

Holiday Recap: Our Favorite Community Posts

We’re lucky to have a dedicated community of DIYers here at Advance. In fact, our customers and Team Members always seem to have great stories to share and tips to teach each other. Since Thanksgiving is all about getting together and giving thanks, we’re sharing our five favorite community stories from 2016. We hope you enjoy them as much as we do. Happy Thanksgiving!

Our First Cars: Three Revs for High School Cars

Advance Auto Parts | Our First Cars

 

National Motorcycle Day: Our Favorite Rides

We Celebrate National Motorcycle Day

Car + Culture: Going Off-Road in Albuquerque

Off-roading in Albuquerque

Advance Dads: Tamekia Richardson’s Dad Had Some Tricks Up His Sleeve

Father's Day - Tamekia Richardson

2016 Patrick Long Pro-Am Kart Race: Making a Difference for All Children’s Hospital

ProAm Racing_Go kart 2

 

Halloween Hacks for Getting the Gross Out of Your Ride

If you find your car covered in blood and mysterious goo this month, don’t rush to call CSI. It’s the witching hour, or—ahem—Halloween ‘season,’ and that means your vehicle has seen some action as a creepy carriage for costumed critters or as a target for cloaked pranksters. As spooky as their appearance may be, the mess they leave can be even more disturbing. Here’s a look at how to remove the Halloween from your car.

The Sarcophagus (aka Car Exterior)

If you’re a dentist giving out toothbrushes instead of candy, you’ll be looking at how to remove egg yolk from your car’s exterior, which is no simple task if the yolk has dried. Ideally, you should fix the issue while the egg is still wet. This solution only requires water and mild soap. Spray the mess down, quickly scrub with soap, rinse, and you’re done. If the egg is as dry as a mummy, it is likely stuck to the paint. Use hot, soapy water to loosen the egg, and slowly attack it with a microfiber towel. Use an automotive soap, as it is mild but effective. Silly string and shaving cream also follow the same rules, so just try and get the majority cleaned off while still wet. And, next year, remember to give out the good candy.

Some pranksters take it a bit further, writing on the windows or tires with white shoe polish. This is water resistant, so you can’t just hose it off. Automotive soap is a good bet, but so are dedicated glass cleaners or tire wash. Follow the directions, and just one application should do it.

The Guts (aka Car Interior)

The interior of your ride may need a bit more work. First, start by removing any leftover trash the ghouls leave behind. Candy wrappers and crumbs can be removed by hand, but a vacuum makes the job much faster. Use a car vacuum or the small nozzle on a shop vac to get glitter out of the carpet and crevices in the dash and between seats. This is also a great option for wigs or fur left over from transporting witches, celebrities, and werewolves.

Your presidential candidates, zombies, and princesses could also get a little loose with the colored hairspray, fake blood, or makeup on the upholstery. Use a carpet and upholstery cleaner to spray the mess, let it sit for a few minutes, and wipe up using a damp cloth.

Adults are no better this time of year, as we overdress for fall weather and dump pumpkin spice into everything. When your friend spills his or her pumpkin-spice latte on your seats, it will probably leave a stain. Grab a dedicated upholstery cleaner and spray it, giving it several minutes to soak. Also use a cleaning agent with enzymes that breaks down food for the best results, and wipe with a clean cloth.

Then wrap up all your hard work with a new scented air freshener. Halloween is over, so it may be time for a winter theme.

Do you have any other tips on how to survive messy monsters? Let us know in the comments!

What You Need to Know About Engine Misfires

Engine misfires can be a mysterious, frustrating problem—and information around them often makes them sound worse than they are. The symptoms vary by vehicle but are usually described as a stumble or brief hesitation in power delivery. An engine misfire can be temporary or continuous and will sometimes generate a check-engine code. But don’t be alarmed. Though it seems like an expensive fix, it usually doesn’t have to be. Read on as we demystify misfires.

Vehicle engine bay

What is a Misfire?

First, let’s examine what causes a misfire. You already know an engine needs three components to fire the cylinder: fuel to ignite, oxygen to burn that fuel, and a spark to ignite the mix. Take away any of those elements, and the cylinder will not produce the expected bang. That sounds like an easy enough diagnosis, but other cylinder misfire causes are due to incorrect ignition timing, vacuum leaks, or valve spring wear.

If your engine is misfiring, it’s best to find the problem and fix it as soon as possible. Misfires reduce gas mileage and increase emissions, which can cause you to fail an emissions test. More seriously, cylinder misfires can cause damage to other engine parts, like the oxygen sensors or catalytic converter. Let’s look at what to do when diagnosing this issue.

When It’s the Spark

Ignition parts that control spark to an engine are primarily wear parts that are designed to provide maximum performance for their service life, then be replaced as needed. As these parts wear or corrode, they will gradually increase impedance to the point that little or no electricity makes it to the spark plug to ignite. Since this happens over time, you may initially have small intermittent misfires you don’t even notice that gradually get worse over time. This is a big clue that your misfire is caused in the ignition system, so start there. Fortunately, most of these items are affordable and easy to quickly replace.

Spark plugs are cheap and easily swapped in just a few minutes. Ignition wires that are old can show signs of wear and are simple to replace as well. Older vehicles with a traditional distributor might just need a new cap and rotor. The coil packs on modern vehicles are less affordable but are still easily serviced.

When It’s the Fuel

After the ignition system is checked out, move on to the fuel system. Parts here typically last longer but still wear out. Perhaps just the fuel filter is clogged, or the fuel injectors are dirty. If those are good, the fuel pump or the mass airflow sensor may be starting to fail.

The EGR valve might be sticking with age, letting exhaust dump into the intake manifold. Emissions systems are precisely designed, and spent exhaust in the wrong part of the ignition cycle will cause issues. Or maybe you are lucky and just filled up with a tank of bad gas.

Fuel-system misfire symptoms will suddenly appear and are often more noticeable at idle than at highway speed. If your engine is chugging at a stoplight but smooth at speed, take a hard look at the fuel system.

When It’s Mechanical

Engine misfires can also be a little more complicated. Check the vacuum lines connected to the intake manifold. Look for cracks and replace lines if you find any problems. Also check the condition of intake manifold gaskets, especially around the throttle body. Take a timing light under the hood to make sure the timing belt or chain has not slipped or jumped. Finally, pop off a valve cover and have a close look at the valve train for any obvious damage.

Unlike fuel misfire symptoms, mechanical misfire symptoms will not go away with higher engine speeds, and often get worse. The misfire can be serious enough to cause noticeable vibration in the cabin, or even backfires. By this point, your engine’s PCM should show a code.

About That Check Engine Light

If you have a “Check Engine” light, your car’s computer is storing information about what problem was detected. The great thing about diagnostic codes is that they can be very specific, even often narrowing down which cylinder is misfiring. That’s less time spent hunting down the problem, so it makes sense to use a code reader to get to the root of the problem.

Have you ever solved a misfire problem? Tell us your solution and advice in the comments below!

Talkin’ Carbs…As In Carburetors vs. Fuel Injection

1970 Camaro Z28 350

1970 Camaro Z28 350

Back in the day, “the day” being the thousands from the mid-1950s through the early 1970s, American performance cars’ fuel delivery system of choice was four-, six- or even eight-barrel carburetion. More often than not you saw a single four-barrel sitting atop the engine’s intake manifold. But a trio of two-barrel carburetors (called “Tri-power” and “Six pack” among other cool sounding names) could be had on some Detroit iron during the ’60s and ’70s, such as the Pontiac GTO, Chevy Corvette, Plymouth Road Runner and Dodge Challenger.

For monsters such as the early ’60s Impala SS409 and the ’67 Shelby GT500 Mustang, nothing less than two four barrel carbs (“dual quads”) would do. Carburetors were not without their pitfalls, however, as tasks like changing jets, synching those multi-carb setups and generally getting them perfectly dialed in were usually best left to a shop with all the necessary tools and expertise.

Pontiac 389 V8 Tripower

Pontiac 389 V8 Tripower

Fuel injection in those early years was very rare, but available on a handful of American cars during some of those years. For example, certain 1957 GM products from Chevrolet and Pontiac offered it just that one year.

As fuel injection was relatively new technology, the bugs weren’t fully worked out so it was dropped as an (admittedly expensive and not popular) option for the full size GM cars the very next year. It did, however, continue to be optional on the Corvette, right through 1965.

As performance-themed American cars passed through the 1980s, fuel-injection came online bigtime.

Thanks to their ability to monitor and make millisecond adjustments for various parameters such as intake air temperature and idle quality, these modern-era F.I. systems were instrumental in bringing back performance after the dark days of the mid-’70s to early ’80s. Being able to precisely control the air/fuel mixture, they allowed engineers to fine tune the engine to both meet tough emissions standards and offer increased power output. Other benefits are smoother operation all around, such as when driving in high elevations and in very cold or hot weather.

fast efiWhich all brings us to the question of: should you have an older performance car, should you keep the old carbs or make the switch to fuel injection? Unless you want to keep your ride 100 percent factory correct for seriously judged shows and such, we’d suggest jumping aboard the injection express.

These “self-tuning” systems offered by Edelbrock, FAST, Holley and MSD will have your ride always operating at peak efficiency without you needing to scrape knuckles and waste precious weekend time. And no worries about having that classic engine compartment ruined with something that looks like a Flux Capacitor, as these systems mimic the iconic look of a big four-barrel carb. So go ahead, put on that original chrome-lidded air cleaner with the engine call-out sticker on it, we won’t tell if you don’t.

Best of all, these state of the art systems make for a fairly simple, bolt-on proposition, essentially the same effort as swapping out carburetors minus the subsequent tuning. After you’ve bolted the system in place, you then enter basic information such as engine size and camshaft specs into a hand-held controller, which gives the system its base-line operating parameters. One twist of the key usually fires up your engine and then you’re smoothly off and running.

As you drive your car, the system’s ECU (Electronic Control Unit) continuously fine tunes itself according to information it picks up from the oxygen sensor. No more rough idling, no more cold-weather stumble. Indeed, according to this article in Hot Rod magazine it couldn’t be easier “No jets, no adjustments, no laptops—just bolt it on and turn the key.”

Editor’s note: You can get your carbs in order and save big at Advance Auto Parts. Buy online, pick up in-store in 30 minutes.
Jim Kazliner, Editor-In-Chief

The Future Is Now: Helpful Car Diagnostic Apps

Mechanic using laptop photoEver since 1996, On-Board Diagnostics generation two (OBD-II) has required all new vehicles manufactured in the United States to have self-diagnostic and reporting capabilities. This gives you access to the status of your vehicles’ systems in real time using a standardized series of diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs).

This is accomplished through a 16-pin connector mounted near the instrument panel that provides four-digit codes for four main areas: P for powertrain; U for computer; C for chassis; and B for body.

Car apps 1Diagnostic scanning tools make DIYing it so much easier – and here are apps that you can access from your smart phone to help you do diagnostics right. Use the app on the road, order the appropriate car parts and you’re off and running on your latest car repair.

Actron U-Scan and more

With U-Scan from Actron, you can discover the cause of the check engine light by plugging a device in your vehicle’s adapter and reading the relevant code definitions. With the QuickCheck™ feature, you can use your Android or Apple device to read the codes appearing on your vehicle, and then, when appropriate, erase them to turn off the check engine light. You can also monitor your emissions status, and maintain a log of vehicle tests and procedures and more.

Advanced features include:

  • Powertrain enhanced data ($7.99 per vehicle or $15.99 for all these manufacturers for most vehicles that are 1996 or newer: GM, Ford, Chrysler, Honda, Hyundai, Nissan and Toyota): Get access to Powertrain codes and definitions. U-Scan’s freeze frame data describes the vehicle’s conditions at the time when the trouble code first appeared. More than 300 sensor/data items are available.
  • ABS codes and definitions ($5.99 per vehicle or $29.99 for all listed manufacturers): Discover the likely causes of ABS warning lights.
  • CodeConnect® ($12.99 per vehicle or $39.99 for all vehicles): More than 4.3 million fixes are available in this database, verified by ASE-certified technicians. Note: You must first purchase the powertrain enhanced data and/or ABS codes and definitions before buying and using CodeConnect.
  • Airbag codes and definitions ($7.99 per vehicle or $39.99 for list manufacturers): Access the most likely causes of airbag warning lights.

It never hurts to compare. In The 6 Best On-Board Diagnostics (OBD) Apps for your Car, you can get more information on other similar apps.

What’s next: car key apps?

In June 2015, the New York Times published an article titled The Future of Car Keys? Smartphone Apps, Maybe, predicting how the car key and fob might evolve. Right now, if you own a Tesla, BMW, General Motors or Volvo, you might already own a key fob that allows you to start the engine, unlock doors, turn on heat and monitor the battery remotely. With the PEPS keys (passive entry, passive start), you don’t even need to remove the fob from your pocket. Its very nearness to the car allows you to unlock doors with a touch, and to start the car with a button push.Car apps diagram

What’s next?

Experts don’t believe that a smartphone app will replace a key, not when a slow data network or dead phone battery would keep you out of your car. Plus, who wants to pay a monthly data subscription plan, which would likely be part of the deal, if you only got what a car fob previously provided? Especially with the complications provided by slow data networks and dead phone batteries? What would be the point?

Hakan Kostepen, the executive director for product planning strategy for Panasonic Automotive Systems, says that keys will eventually carry driver preferences, such as seating positions and favorite audio choices, even when you’re in a rental car. A smartphone app could work with the key data to recommend places to visit, eat and so forth, based on your known preferences.

Finally, Audi and Volvo are experimenting with groceries and packages being delivered to car trunks and the owner being notified. Car key usage would be authorized for a one-time use.

Editor’s note: What apps do you like? Which ones do you plan to try next? Leave us a comment below.

 

Exclusive Coverage: DuPont Registry HQ Cars & Coffee

DuPont 4

The crisp morning air greets a diligent car fan on a Saturday morning when the garage opens at 6:14 AM. It’s time for DuPont Registry Headquarters Cars & Coffee in St. Petersburg, Florida. The early morning car fanatic pulls off a cover and backs the 1965 introductory-year Porsche 911 onto the driveway. A quick dust off and it’s ready to go. This car doesn’t see the light of day often but the roads are quiet and the crowds are calm, so there’s no better time than now.

What is the DuPont Registry Headquarters Cars & Coffee event? Let us set the scene.

The DuPont Registry website lists “highline luxury cars for sale by auto dealers and private owners. In addition, consumers can search for wheels, car accessories, tuning, racing schools, exotic car rentals, and a wide variety of products/services for the enthusiast.” On certain designated days – such as the Cars & Coffee event held most recently on Saturday, July 18, 2015 – you can visit the physical location and see luxury cars, up close and in person.

DuPont 9We attended that event and had a chat with the organizers of the ten-year-strong show. Its success and popularity originally came through word-of-mouth advertising. While an event now typically draws in a few hundred cars, DuPont Registry doesn’t charge admission – not even for parking. They also give back to the community, allowing a local church to join them to sell coffee and doughnuts to the crowd.

DuPont 18Popularity of the events, organizers tell us, definitely has seasonal cycles. Fall and spring are busy times, while the winter and dead of summer are for diehards only. During more well-attended events, organizers have their work cut out for them. Not only do the local law enforcement need to be on board, but fans have to behave appropriately.

The good news: Cars & Coffee at DuPont has no end in sight. As long as the fans keep the cars on the road and the sheriff is on board, the show will go on.

More Cars & CoffeeDuPont 3

Across the country, Cars & Coffee monthly car meets have been popping up at an incredible rate. In fact, some popular events have even outgrown their venues, including one of the most highly acclaimed Saturday morning shows, located in Irvine, California. As the event kept growing, it outgrew its humble location in 2015, becoming too massive to remain a calm and fun-for-everyone event.DuPont 20

Cars & Coffee events offer a unique atmosphere that is addicting for car lovers who want to see the rare and eclectic – and to talk to the owners of these uncommon cars (and bikes!) who truly treasure them. One of the bigger events is the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance.

The best part of one of these shows: meeting new people and hearing the story about a car, where it came from, where’s it been. Give someone a good cup of coffee and a few doughnuts, and you’ll have that person talking in no time.DuPont 14

Looking towards the future

Coming up this fall, the DuPont Registry Headquarters will host another type of event because, when Mr. DuPont wants more shows, his team will deliver. You can count on that.

Here’s a hint … just think cars, stars, and a show fit for the big screen.

Editor’s note: So what if your daily driver isn’t as glamorous as the ones shown above. You can still ensure it rides right and looks good with parts and tools from Advance Auto Parts. Buy online, pick up in-store in 30 minutes.

Mark your calendars: 46th Swigart Meet August 7-9, 2015

Swigart 2 If you’re looking for a place to display your antique or classic car and spend a weekend with like-minded people, consider adding the annual Swigart Meet in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania to your schedule. Not only will you see plenty of outstanding cars at the meet, but you can then go into the nearby museum to see even more incredible vehicles, including rare – and even unique – cars.

Prior Swigart Meets have featured the following cars:

  • 1925 Packard four-door sedan
  • 1968 Honda Dream motorcycle
  • 1979 Lincoln Continental Mark V Limousine (formerly owned by Conrad Hilton)
  • 1960 Austin Healey Sprite
  • 1976 Pontiac Trans-Am Coupe
  • 1999 Plymouth Prowler

Find photos and more information about the 2014 meet here. And, if you attend in 2015, be sure to visit the museum that co-sponsors the meet.

William E. Swigart, Jr. Automobile Museum

The National Association of Automobile Museums has only given out three Lifetime Achievement Awards: to Henry Ford, William F. Farrah (National Automobile Museum) and W. Emmett Swigart.

  1. Emmett Swigart may have been the first person to recognize the value in collecting old cars, first sharing his collection in 1920, after watching beat up vehicles being dismantled for parts. This was an era when many entrepreneurs tried their hand at car manufacturing, with typically small production runs – most of which haven’t been in production for a long time now.

He passed on his love of unique cars to his son, William E. Swigart, Jr., who opened the William E. Swigart, Jr. Automobile Museum in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania.

Swigart 1While at the museum

Billed as the oldest museum for automobiles, it contains rare cars, including these three one-of-a-kind treasures:

  • 1936 Duesenberg 12-cylinder Gentlemen Speedster with 160 hp; a Lycoming L-head, V-12 engine; 390.8 ci; and 3 speed manual transmission. Two of these cars were built, but one was lost in a fire. The one in the museum was previously owned by actor Jackie Coogan.
  • 1916 Scripps-Booth, a luxury vehicle built in Detroit; this was the year that Scripps-Booth merged with the Sterling Motor Company, with a goal to build 12,000 cars in just one year.
  • 1920 Carroll Six: one of the previous owners, Eric Johnson, used scrap airplane parts from a WWII PT19 Fairchild trainer engine to repair the vehicle; more about the Carroll Six later.

This is the only museum with two Preston Tucker vehicles, located side-by-side, including his hand built 1947 Tin Goose Prototype. Plus, this museum may have the largest license plate and radiator emblem collection in the country.

Overall, there are approximately 200 vehicles in the collection, with 35 to 40 on them on display at any one time. Other rare cars include:

  • 1930 Model J dual-cowl phaeton, a “straight-eight” with dual overhead cams and 265 hp
  • 1903 Curved Dash Oldsmobile, one of 3,924 of this model built in this year, the third year of production for the company
  • 1910 Winton Six Model 17-B, with 48.6 hp and a cost of $3,000 when brand new (more than $73,000 in today’s dollars)

Carroll SixCarroll Car 1

Advance Auto Parts did a bit of digging into the story behind the Carroll Six. Why? Because it was built by one of the 70 to 80 entrepreneurs who manufactured cars in the Cleveland area during the early 20th century – and because there is only one known example left in the world.

To that end, car historian Bob Kayle provided us with the January-March 1991 issue of The Bulb Horn, the publication of The Veteran Motor Car Club of America. Through this resource and a handful of others, we discovered that:

  • Charles F. Carroll, an attorney, successful advertising professional and inventor, announced his new car in Lorain, Ohio’s Times Herald on January 13, 1920.
  • He rented factory space, created blueprints, gathered car parts and persuaded wealthy local stockholders to invest in his dream.
  • “Two bodies will be furnished, one a close coupled five passenger touring car and the other a roadster, and will be finished in either Carroll green or Burgundy red. The wheelbase is 131” and it will have an aluminum body upholstered in leather. The six-cylinder engine develops 48 hp and has enclosed overhead valves. Full equipment includes six disc wheels, Fisk cord tires, permanent type top, and trunk with a built-in rack.”
  • The roadster never came into being and the wheelbase was scaled down to 128”.

Distribution was a big problem for early car manufacturers, but Carroll quickly secured a partner in San Francisco, Fred W. Hauger, who planned to sell this car in 11 states, plus the Hawaiian Islands.

One hundred and six cars were scheduled for 1920, although it’s unlikely that the production goal for this “attractive and even a bit racy” vehicle was reached. The car had a:

  • radiator that was set back seven and a half inches from the front axle
  • body, hood and fenders that were “pleasingly curved”
  • swept-back windshield that gave it a slightly futuristic look

The car was not cheap ($3,895 or more than $45,000 in today’s dollars) but it did come with leather-covered steel top, side curtains, long running boards with dual side-mount spare tires, Bijur starting and lighting, and a K.W. ignition system.

Some Carroll cars were allegedly ruined when they were shipped to California without antifreeze. When the weather turned cold, the engines were ruined, a serious financial blow to the company. By May 1922, the company was out of money and one of the investors was said to help himself to four cars, plus a partially built one, plus some parts as his self-determined repayment. Although there are rumors of four Carroll cars still being in existence, only the one at the Swigart museum is a certainty.

Editor’s note: What other rare or unique cars are out there? Leave a comment below.

 

Mudding Anyone?

Truck mudding photoOur resident Gearhead gets down and dirty with the fine art of Mudding.

Remember when you were a little kid and the idea of playing in the mud outside after it rained got you hyped? Pushing your toy cars and trucks through the mud puddles while you did your best to enunciate the sound of a beefed-up engine was one of life’s simple joys. Well, now you’re a grown-up with a rugged four-wheel-drive rig and maybe you want to kick up some summer mud, albeit on a much grander and exciting scale. Here’s a video that gives you a taste of what a blast this sub-category of off-roading can be.

Jeep_Wrangler  photoChoose your weapon
To probably nobody’s surprise, the most popular mud tamer is the modern-day Jeep Wrangler and its very similar old-school forebears, Jeep’s CJ-5 and CJ-7. Compact dimensions, plenty of ground clearance, stout four-wheel-drive components and room in the wheel wells for large off-road tires are key reasons these iconic Jeeps reign supreme.

But they are far from the only good choices. Older Toyota Land Cruisers (the more basic four-door SUV styles as well as the Jeep-like FJ40) are very capable and durable rigs, as are the first- and second-generation Ford Broncos. Of course, 4WD pickup trucks are solid picks too, though the massive, full-size ones can sometimes prove too bulky in off-road environments with narrow trails. As such, we favor compact, more maneuverable pickups such as the Ford Ranger, Nissan Frontier and Toyota Tacoma. One might also consider a Land Rover Defender, though aces off road, they tend to be rather pricey.1988_Toyota_Land_Cruiser photo

Mudding 101
Depending on the scenario, simply popping your truck into 4WD and driving on through the muck as if you’re on pavement may not be sufficient. As with any type of challenge, there are proper techniques that separate the hackers from those that know what they’re doing. As such, thanks to the pros at off-road.com, fourwheeler.com and allstate.com, we’ve come up with a six-pack of tips to make sure that you move through the mud.

1) Don’t go it alone. Having at least one other person with a truck and recovery gear (such as a powerful winch) provides peace of mind, as well as a helping hand (and truck) should you get stuck.

2) Air down your tires. Lowering your tires’ pressure increases surface area and allows the tires to flex and grab traction better than when they’re fully-aired up for on-road use. Dropping down to 18 to 20 psi should be about right.

3) If it looks like a rather deep mud puddle / bog you’re attempting to negotiate, you might want to hop out and go on recon first. Grab a long stick and check it out on foot, poking the stick in various spots to get an idea of the mud’s consistency, its depth and if there are any large rocks or tree roots lying below in wait.

4) Take the proper line. If others are also having fun in the muddy playground, watch and take note of the line they’re taking as they work their way through. Usually going straight is best, but there may be some obstructions or stickier points that may dictate using a different, more traction-friendly line that somebody else has demonstrated.

5) If your vehicle has a low range, then start out in 4WD low. This will obviously maximize your traction and torque at the low speeds you’ll be using to make your way through the mud.

6) Take it easy. Throwing up 15-foot high rooster tails of muddy water at higher speed may look cool in commercials, but you could lose control and end up doing some damage or stalling out your engine. It’s slow and steady that wins this race. As the experts say and as with other types of off-roading, you should go as slow as possible but as fast as necessary to keep moving forward. Momentum, not speed, is your best friend here.

2004_Ford_Ranger photoMuddy buddies
So you’ve discovered that you really dig playing in the mud. Fortunately, so do a lot of other off-road enthusiasts. Reading the various online forums for tips on where to go, how to set up your vehicle and how to improve your skills will help you enjoy your mucked up adventures even more. We suggest also checking out enthusiast sites such as mudtrails.com and offroadworld.net, which are also great for finding new friends that share this dirty passion.

Editor’s note: After you’ve gotten your fill of summer mudding, be sure to hit up Advance Auto Parts for a wide selection of wash and wax products.

 

Crucial Cars: Eagle Talon

1990 eagle talon tsi photoFrom timeless icons to everyday essentials, Crucial Cars examines the vehicles we can’t live without.

In this installment, Street Talk puts the spotlight on a rare but desirable bird in the sport compact segment – the Eagle Talon

One of a set of automotive triplets, the Eagle Talon is a rather rare bird in the sport compact car arena. Indeed, can you remember the last time you saw an Eagle Talon flying down the road? Yet this product of American and Japanese parents was one of the more interesting choices in its segment. Along with its aggressive, head-turning styling it offered available turbocharged power and all-wheel drive, the latter two features giving it a wheel or two up on the more popular kids in this class, the Honda Civic, Acura Integra and Nissan 240 SX.

The Eagle has hatched
Debuting for 1990 along with its Plymouth Laser and Mitsubishi Eclipse triplet siblings, the Eagle Talon was a product of a joint venture between Chrysler and Mitsubishi. All built in the U.S. at the “Diamond Star Motors” plant located in Normal, Illinois, these three cars shared similar sporty hatchback styling and Mitsubishi mechanicals. The base Eagle Talon came with a 2.0-liter, 16-valve four with 135 horsepower, while the TSi and TSi AWD versions packed a turbocharged 2.0-liter sporting 190 and 195 horses, respectively. Transmission choices consisted of a five-speed manual and four-speed automatic. Initially at least, unlike the Laser and Eclipse, the Talon didn’t sully its image with a price-leading, 92-hp stripper version. With 135 hp, even that base Talon provided peppy performance, but we know you’re probably thinking: “Yeah, that’s great, but tell me about the turbo!”

In 1990, squeezing nearly 200 horsepower from a four-cylinder turbocharged engine was big news. And thanks to the stout low- and mid-range grunt that a turbo provides, this meant blowing off less-muscular rivals from Honda, Toyota and Nissan was a breeze. Capable of sprinting to 60 mph in less than 7 seconds and running down the quarter mile in the low-15-second range, a Talon TSi was a genuine thrill ride back in the early ‘90s.1993 eagle talon tsi photo

Offering all-wheel drive to more effectively put that power to the pavement provided an edge in handling, especially in foul weather conditions. The AWD version of the TSi also featured a more sophisticated rear suspension (multi-link versus torsion beam) as well as limited-slip center and rear differentials. Outfitted with a set of Bridgestone Blizzaks and a ski rack, a Talon TSi AWD was a skier’s or snowboarder’s dream.

Changes from 1990 through 1994 were mostly minimal. Notable highlights included, for 1992, slightly revised front- and rear-end styling and a switch from pop-up headlights to exposed units. The following year saw the debut of a declawed Talon. Dubbed the DL, this downgraded version shared its 92-hp engine and sparse standard features list with its entry-level Diamond Star siblings. The previous “base” Talon essentially continued as a new “ES” trim level.

Eagle Talon Version 2.0
As with the Eclipse, the Talon was redesigned for 1995 (the Laser was dropped after 1994). The two cars looked even more similar than before. One might argue that the Talon had more handsome styling, with a larger set of tail lights that helped minimize the heavy, “loaded diaper” rear bumper look of its Mitsu relative.

More importantly, performance was boosted via a pair of more powerful engines. Seen in the new entry-level “ESi” trim, the 2.0-liter non-turbo four now made 140 horsepower, while the turbocharged versions seen in the TSi and TSi AWD made 210 hp (205 with the automatic transmission). As such, acceleration times were a few tenths or so quicker, meaning a TSi AWD could hit 60 in about 6.3 seconds and rip through the quarter mile in the high 14-second range.

1995 eagle talon tsi photoSadly, the Eagle Talon, and indeed the Eagle brand itself, would soar no more after 1998, having been discontinued after that model year. The biggest changes for these second-generation models took place for 1997, when once again Eagle debuted a stripped-out base model that deleted the ESi’s rear spoiler, audio system and intermittent wipers. Thankfully, this entry-level version did not substitute a weaker engine as it had in the past. That year also saw rear drum brakes replace the previously standard rear discs in non-turbo models, while the TSi AWD version got larger (17-inch versus previous 16-inch) alloy wheels. A larger front badge and rear spoiler are the more notable visual clues to these later second-gen Talons.

Endangered species
Should you be a fan of these exciting Eagles and want to capture one, you’ll likely find that task fairly difficult given that they were last produced nearly two decades ago. Still, that doesn’t mean impossible. Checking out the enthusiasts sites, such as DSMtalk and DSMtuners can provide a wealth of information, such as the most effective and economical mods, as well as classified ads for the cars themselves. And there’s always craigslist, eBay and bringatrailer.com, where your chances of finding an unmodified example are likely much greater than doing so on the dedicated sites.

Editor’s note: Advance Auto Parts is here to help in the care and feeding of your Eagle Talon, or otherwise. Buy online, pick up in-store in 30 minutes.