The Tantalizing New Shelby Mustang Terlingua

Shelby Mustang Terlingua

What does Terlingua mean?
It’s pretty much common knowledge that Carroll Shelby was a fun-loving son-of-a-gun. Back in the 1960s, when he fielded a racing team with his buddies Bill Neale and Jerry Titus, Shelby and his Mustang mates would unwind at a large ranch in Terlingua, Texas. Hunting, riding dirt bikes and general hell-raising were the “R and R” activities of choice for these merrymaking men.

Jackrabbits were a common sight around the 200,000-acre ranch and gave rise to a mascot designed by Bill Neale for the racing team. And so the Jackrabbit logo, seemingly in a “Stop right there—you really don’t think you can beat us, do you?” pose, was born.

What’s a Shelby Mustang Terlingua?
In short, the Terlingua is the most track-focused Shelby Mustang you can get, that also pays tribute to that great 1960s racing team which won the 1967 Trans-Am championship. Sporting the iconic Jackrabbit on its fenders, the modern Terlingua is dressed in the black and yellow color scheme that the team primarily used back in the days when Sergeant Pepper and Pet Sounds were climbing the Billboard charts.

Shelby Mustang Terlingua Racing Team

Nostalgia aside, this ‘stang is chock-full of the latest race goodies. There are carbon fiber components aplenty, such as the hood, front splitter, rocker panels, rear spoiler, and rear diffuser.

Under that vented hood sits a supercharged, 5.0-liter V8, shared with the Shelby Super Snake Mustang, which sends “over 750 horsepower” to the pavement via either a six-speed manual or six-speed automatic transmission. Suspension tweaks include adjustable Eibach coil-overs, camber/caster plates, and lightweight 20-inch Weld wheels. Stopping power is adequately fortified with 6-piston front/4-piston rear Brembo brakes.

Shelby Mustang Terlingua
Interior highlights include added gauges for boost and oil pressure, unique headrests, and a plaque signed by Shelby, Neile, and Titus. Racing seats are optional.

Under that vented hood sits a supercharged, 5.0-liter V8, shared with the Shelby Super Snake Mustang, which sends “over 750 horsepower” to the pavement.

Track time
We put the Terlingua through its paces at Spring Mountain Ranch race track, which is about 60 miles west of Las Vegas. For comparison purposes (and to show off the rest of their fun-loving Mustang lineup), the Shelby folks also had a couple of Super Snake Mustangs on hand, on which the Terlingua is based, as well as a Shelby GT Mustang EcoBoost. Keep in mind these are all ultra-high performance versions of Ford’s already capable Mustang, with plenty of power underfoot and sharpened-up handling to go with it. And yet the Terlingua quickly showed itself to be the top track jock of the group.

Once we were comfortable with the circuit, the pace quickened, and we found that the Terlingua was very well-planted and confident when being caned around the track. The well-weighted, communicative steering and buttoned-down suspension allowed us to consistently pick off apexes with surgical precision. Even when running through a slight rise and dip in the track while approaching one of the first turns, this Shelby didn’t wiggle or waver off line.

Blasting out of the corners and down the straights in this well-behaved beast was effortless, thanks to the linear delivery of the tidal-wave of thrust on tap. Those brawny Brembos chipped in as well, allowing us to brake late and hard, time and again with no fade, as we dove aggressively into the turns.

Shelby Mustang Terlingua
Want one?
With a production run of just 75 total cars, of which 50 are slated for the U.S., the Shelby Terlingua Mustang will be a rare sight indeed. Pricing starts at $65,999, but that’s on top of the cost of a new 2015/2016 Mustang GT, meaning you’re at about $100 grand minimum.

For those lucky few who pony up (sorry) for a Mustang that can go head to head on a road course with European thoroughbreds that are three times the price, we salute you. The rest of us will be watching videos of your epic track days on YouTube.

2016 Patrick Long Pro-Am Kart Race: Making a Difference for All Children’s Hospital

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For the fifth year in a row, professional drivers and weekend racers gathered the day after the Mobile 1 Twelve Hours of Sebring with one goal, to raise money for All Children’s Hospital, a pediatric hospital located in St. Petersburg, Florida that specializes in providing pediatric care for those with challenging medical problems.

On Sunday, March 20th, seven pro drivers joined a team of countless donors and volunteers on the Andersen RacePark track for a 1.5-hour endurance race, on go-karts. The event presents a rare opportunity for fans to team up with and meet some of their favorite professional drivers.

Will Reilly, event committee member, is an enthusiastic advocate of the Kart Race mission, stating, “After visiting All Children’s Hospital a few times for the planning meetings and seeing where the money was going; I knew it was going to be worth it to be part of this event.”

Race Day: A Well-Oiled Machine

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Donations came in all forms, from cash to entry fees. A silent auction of donations from the pro drivers and collectibles contributed by local dealerships and race teams were combined with a live auction. Items up for bid ranged from peculiar to heart-warming: race shoes worn by pro drivers in historic Petit Le Mans races, the skinny front tires from the famed DeltaWing racing car, and framed paintings done by patients of All Children’s Hospital.

On the track, the competitive spirit was in full swing. Most of the teams started their pro drivers first while the karts were cool and running quickly. Then, in the blink of an eye, the driver changes began, in true endurance race fashion. The karts alternated amongst the teams as they cycled through the drivers. In turn, no advantages could be introduced. Each driver had to participate a fair amount, meaning amateur entrants and pros alike had to pull their own weight to secure a win.

A Thrilling Finish

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The fifth year of racing brought seasoned drivers with experience and strategy to the race, along with plenty of memorable moments. There were some healthy jousts at the start. Patrick Long jumped in for a driver that couldn’t make it and Jordan Taylor (who started the race for his team) qualified first. He cycled back through the driver changes and helped his team keep first place for the win.

Andersen RacePark, Patrick Long, the volunteers, drivers and donors raised $60,000 to benefit All Children’s Hospital.

The Future Ahead

“Aside from the fun and excitement from the event, it’s really the kids that keep me coming back year after year,” said Reilly.

Reilly’s right. Besides creating a fun, adrenaline-satisfying atmosphere, the event created a positive impact on the families whom will benefit from the funds raised.

We’ve been before and will return again. This event shows what these great drivers and people are truly capable of – making a lasting impact on their community.

To make your own contribution to the charity, visit their site.

Modern Mods for Vintage Muscle Cars

There are many of us out there who dig old muscle cars and enjoy wrenching, but who don’t necessarily want to be “hood up” every other weekend tending to their ride’s sometimes fickle ways. Guys or gals who’d rather be burning rubber than burning daylight. One of our writers, JDP, fondly recalls his ’69 Chevelle SS396, stating it was the only car he’s ever driven that he was a little afraid off, so brutal was its acceleration, rightfully accompanied by the heavy metal chorus of its exhaust bellowing through headers and a pair of Cherry Bomb glasspacks.

But being able to enjoy the thrill of that built-up monster was not without its price, and we’re not just talking about the 8-10 mpg appetite. Fitted with a dual point distributor and a Holley 750 Double Pumper carb, his SS wasn’t exactly easy to keep in a perfect state of tune. If JDP still owned it today, he says a few modern updates would have probably been done to it by now. The trio of suggestions we present here would be nothing that would affect your muscle car’s loveable character mind you, just things that would improve its reliability, overall performance and safety.

Pertronix electronic ignition

Pertronix electronic ignition

All Fired Up
Plenty of shade tree mechanics who’ve grown tired of fiddling with ignition points have made the switch to an electronic ignition. With their “plug and play” convenience, an electronic ignition means one less thing to worry about, and deal with come tune-up time. A perfectly timed, hot spark delivered to your beast’s cylinders efficiently takes the worry out of one aspect of the holy trinity of internal combustion requirements (the other two being air and fuel).

Top choices for making this upgrade include systems by Mallory (who recently merged with MSD) and Pertronix. Indeed, the latter company offers a system that fits within the distributor, thus preserving the original appearance of the engine compartment.

 

FAST electronic fuel injection

Bye Bye Four Barrel
Whether it’s a scorching summer day or a crisp fall morning, and whether you’re driving along the coast or up high in the mountains, there’s no denying that fuel injection has the advantage over a carburetor in terms of delivering a precisely metered air/fuel mixture regardless of changing driving conditions.

We actually covered this very topic not long ago in our Carburetors versus Fuel Injection article. As we stated there, these “self-tuning” systems offered by Edelbrock, FAST, Holley and MSD will have your ride always operating at peak efficiency without you needing to deal with re-jetting and making other adjustments you’d face with a carb. And no worries about having that classic engine compartment ruined with something that looks like a Flux Capacitor, as some of these systems mimic the iconic look of a big four-barrel carb.

Stop it, will ya?
Crazy as it sounds, some of the most potent muscle cars made came standard with drum brakes all around, with front discs being optional rather than standard on certain models. It’s pretty much common knowledge that discs do a much better job of swiftly hauling a car down from speed than the old drums. That’s why a brake swap — be it just from front drums to factory-spec discs or a considerably more powerful setup sporting massive discs and calipers all around — serves as a very worthwhile performance and safety upgrade.

 

 

For your next automotive project, head to Advance Auto Parts for all the auto parts, tools and accessories you’ll need for the job!

New Podcast – Under The Hood

Blair Garner, host of NASH/America’s Morning Show and newly-named inductee to the Country Radio Hall of Fame, has partnered with Advance Auto Parts to create Under the Hood, a new, custom podcast that is all about cars.

New episodes are released on the last Wednesday of the month, with occasional tips or quick stories released as Blair learns of auto news.  Subscribe to the podcast using the subscribe button below.

The Wonders of Sea Foam

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We explore the rich history and impact of this magical elixir.

It’s a beautiful spring day and so you decide to drive to a car show and take pictures of the new vehicles on display. You carefully fold up your map of the area and put it into your glove box. You make sure that you have extra rolls of 35mm film, you do some quick maintenance on your car  and you plan to return home in time to get your film to the drug store that develops your photos…

Quick question: did this scenario take place in 2015? Why or why not?

The answer to part one is: highly unlikely. This paragraph is chock full of products and scanrios that, if not obsolete, are definitely headed that way – which makes the story of Sea Foam all the more amazing.

“This product was invented in the 1930s,” says Sea Foam’s marketing director, Brian Miller, “and trademarked in 1942. Sea Foam was invented in a time when engines were much less sophisticated than they are today, with fuel that was quite different from today’s options. And yet, the same Sea Foam that improved the quality of fuel then still works every bit as well today.”

Glimpse back into the 1930s

Fred Fandrei enjoyed fishing, but he frequently experienced problems with his outboard motor. He diagnosed it as gummy varnish created by the gas and oil needed to power his engine and the “thought of spending more time fishing than working on the motor prompted Fred, who was a District Manager for the Sinclair Refining Company at that time and had a good knowledge of fuel, to invent a product that would stop the gas/oil mixture from becoming stale.”

Fred stored his product in beer bottles and quart jars and sold it to other fishermen. When one of them asked him for some of his “Sea Foam” stuff, Fred liked the name and began using it for his concoction. He advertised in Field and Stream and Outdoor Life for a while but the market demand soon started shifting from marine to automotive.

To give you a sense of the latest and greatest innovations in the car world during that era: they included low-pressure balloon tires, replacing those hard tires of the past, and windshield wipers, along with synchromesh transmissions for smoother shifting, automatic chokes, built-in trunks, hydraulic brakes and gear shifts on steering columns. Most cars now boasted both radios and heaters, and still featured foot boards and sunshades on the car’s windscreens. Radiator grilles tilted back slightly and were often made of flashy-looking chrome – and Henry Ford invented the one-piece V-8 engine for the common man. Here’s more about the cars of 1930s – and now we’ll move onto discussing what has made Sea Foam so effective for more than seventy years.Sea Foam can 2 picture

Wonders of Sea Foam

All carbon-based fuels and engine oils leave behind petroleum-based residue. Over time, these naturally build up and eventually prevent lifters and rings from working as they should, and this residue also affects injectors, pistons and intake valves. For optimum engine performance, car owners need to periodically do a clean-up job – and Brian explains how Sea Foam accomplishes this task using a petroleum-blended product.

Now, this can seem counter-intuitive. Why on earth would you use petroleum to clean up the residue from petroleum?

Brian offers a clear and concise explanation. “If you’ve ever gotten oil-based paint on your hands,” he says, “you know that using water to clean yourself up only makes matters worse. Instead, you use something oil based to remove the paint. The same is true when you want to clean your engine. The petroleum solvency cleans your fuel system and removes gummy substances that hinder performance – and is harmless to your engine.” As the company website describes the process, “Sea Foam helps slowly and safely re-liquefy this varnish so contaminants and deposits can be safely cleaned out of the systems as the engine is operated.”

Other additives on the market are either detergent based or use a combination of detergent and petroleum, Brian says, although he is quick to add that he has respect for competing additive brands. “We don’t tear them down to make ourselves look good,” he says. “Instead, we talk about how quickly and consistently Sea Foam solves problems.”

Sea Foam can also help, according to the company website, with lack of lubrication and with absorption of moisture from the atmosphere and condensation. And, here’s an overall message about the product from the company: “Sea Foam can be used by professionals and do-it-yourselfers alike to help safely eliminate many contamination and lubrication related performance problems and help prolong the life of an engine. A clean, dry and well lubricated engine will run smoother and more efficiently.”

What people say about Sea Foam

Marketing directors usually share a remarkable story or two about someone who has had incredible success in using their product. Brian, though, was an exception to the rule, providing no stories of nuclear-level success. He instead emphasizes how quickly and consistently the product has worked for a wide range of challenges over several decades – and how the product continues to do that, even as engines and fuels evolve and become more sophisticated.

“Stories from satisfied customers are so common,” Brian says, “that no one story stands out. Whether someone needs to deal with engine hesitation, poor idling or rough performance – and whether that person wants better performance out of a pickup truck, a sports car, or even a chain saw, their problems are quickly resolved.”

If he were to wear a Sea Foam t-shirt into a grocery store, he says, people would walk up to him to share their stories. “It’s fun to meet people who are excited about their experiences,” he adds, “and as long as we use carbon-based fuels, there will be degradation of that fuel, and we’ll still be relevant. We’ll still be around to help.”

Editor’s note: Advance Auto Parts carries the Sea Foam products your car needs.

 

 

Surviving the Rolex

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Surviving the Rolex 24 at Daytona

Enjoying a race on any normal day is an easy task. Scorching heat, pouring rain or similar environmental inconveniences won’t prevent you from enjoying the race. After all, you want to be there. When it’s over in a few hours, you’ll just head home or head out for a bite to eat while traffic dies down. But what happens when the race is more than just a few hours? How about considerably more … such as 24 hours.

Endurance races like the Rolex 24 at Daytona are notorious for being unpredictable. That’s part of their mystique and part of how they’ve earned their place at the top of motorsports totem pole.

Today we’re sharing our top tips for making the most of Rolex, which this year (2016) runs Jan 30 – 31. Common sense helps, except this race is anything but common.

Ponchos. Bring them.

Rain seems to be an every-other-year occurrence, perfectly timed to catch everyone off-guard. Nothing says, “Let’s do this!” like starting off the race drenched to the core. You have 24 hours of racing ahead, and in the lottery that is Florida weather patterns, the potential for wet weather mishaps is real.

Water. Drink it.

While you are busy keeping dry, remember to hydrate. Start well before you get to the track. A $6 concession stand water isn’t fun for anyone, but neither is passing out. There’s a theme here – water can both make and break your Rolex 24 experience, so be prepared.

Sharpies. Leave your mark.

You could use Sharpies for autographs, if you are into that sort of thing. But at Daytona, Sharpies serve another purpose. Use your Sharpie to sign the track, not a hero card. About two hours before the race, find out when and where you need to be to get out for the fan grid walk. See the cars up close, meet the drivers, get some pictures and then go see those high bankings for yourself. And don’t forget to sign the start/finish line.

An old-school battery-powered radio.

Two creature comforts are scarce when you are trackside in Daytona – power and cellular signal. More than 50,000 people will show up to this race, which can overwhelm nearby cell towers. This can make communicating with friends difficult and accessing the IMSA live stream nearly impossible.

However, there is still an old-school AM station you can use to get a more complete picture of the race. If you are parking in the infield (a very popular and highly sought after ticket) just be careful not to drain your car’s battery. Getting roadside service inside the track from an external source can leave you waiting for hours.

Sunscreen. And a good hat.

Lots of people forget that just because it’s nice outside doesn’t mean that the sun can’t get you. A solid sunburn from Saturday makes Sunday morning miserable.

Cash.

While the vendors try their best to take plastic, there’s nothing like going without lunch because no one can get cell service on their wireless card readers. We’ve also seen a few well-placed dollars buy VIP seats on top of enterprising fans’ Winnebagos.

Family and friends.

Bring your friends, family and kids. It’s time to make some memories. 24 hours of racing is best enjoyed with entertaining people by your side. No one believes you when there’s no backup for a crazy race story, so you better have someone along to corroborate those tales. Keep in mind that race cars are LOUD so ear protection for the family is a good idea as well.

Maximize your smiles per hour at this year’s Rolex 24 by getting out there and exploring. We gave you our tips for getting ready, but it’s up to you to explore the new views Daytona built this year. Don’t dwell on the loss of the Party Porch, take the chance to get up high in the stands and find a new view for you.

Look for our reporting from this year’s event, and check out our coverage of last year’s Rolex 24.

 

Editor’s note: Whether you drive a race car or only dream about it, visit Advance Auto Parts for the best in savings and selection for your ride.

Winter Vision – See Better, Drive Safer

Winter products for your vehicle can help you see better, drive safer.

winter visibility shutterstock_671748786519129117As you drive along a road covered with snow, slush and ice-melting chemicals, the wipers swiping intermittently across the windshield to clear the mess and your field of vision, say a quick “thank you” to Mary Anderson and Robert Kearns. Because of these two inventors, today’s drivers can see clearly during rain and snow, but only if they’re showing their wipers, windshield, and lights some love periodically.

If it weren’t for Anderson, an Alabama woman who invented and patented the first windshield wipers, drivers might still be sliding open a portion of the windshield just to have a clear view, much the same way electric street car drivers did in the late 1800s. That scenario inspired Anderson, as she rode in a street car one winter day, to design the first wiper arms. Crafted from rubber and wood, she patented the invention and tried unsuccessfully to sell the design. Her patent expired before she could profit from it however, even though wipers became standard on most vehicles by 1913.

Kearns invented and patented the intermittent wiper system in 1964 and later successfully sued Ford and Chrysler for using his technology after they declined his offer of a licensing agreement. Kearns, his protracted legal battles with the auto manufacturing industry, and the toll it took on his personal life, were chronicled in the movie Flash of Genius. His intermittent wipers first appeared in vehicles in 1969.

This winter, wipers, windshield chemicals, and lights are the key to clear vision and safe driving. Here are some tips that help deliver maximum visibility.

Wiper blades – if the wipers are more than six months old, consider replacing them. Rubber wears out with time and exposure to the environment and can become hard and cracked. Colder temperatures and ice or snow buildup on windows can also hasten the demise of old wiper blades. The trend in wiper blades now is toward the newer “beam” style blades. They’re a better choice for winter because the spring mechanism is concealed and protected from ice and snow, eliminating the chances of a buildup that stops the wiper from working properly.  Beam blades also make more contact with the windshield, reducing wiper chatter and delivering a much clearer wipe in any temperature. While you’re at it, don’t forget the rear window wiper and headlight wipers, if your vehicle is equipped with them.

Windshield chemicals and tools – a quick and efficient way to remove frost and light ice and get your morning commute off to a faster start is to fill your windshield washer reservoir with a de-icing washer fluid. Not only do these types of windshield chemicals melt frozen precipitation, they also help repel dirt and salt from road spray. Treating the windshield’s exterior with a Rain-X glass treatment product also helps repel water, snow, ice and dirt.

For heavier ice and snow, make sure you keep an ice scraper and snow brush in the vehicle to make clearing the windows easier. For SUV’s and trucks, consider purchasing a long-handled snow brush or broom. It enables you to clear the entire windshield without having to switch sides or stand too close to the vehicle and get covered in snow while clearing it. And, before the first frost, check the front and rear window defrosters to ensure they’re working properly.

Lights – shorter days and inclement weather mean more time driving in the dark. Walk around your vehicle to confirm that all its lights, including turn signals and brake lights, are working. Even if your headlights aren’t burned out, you might want to replace them. Headlights dim over time, sometimes by as much as 20 percent. Additionally, old headlights don’t include the recent advances in lighting technology, such as halogen lights, that shine more light on the road and roadsides and enable drivers to see further and with a wider field of vision.

Editor’s note: Lights, chemicals, wipers – Advance Auto Parts has exactly what your vehicle needs. Buy online, pick up in store, get back to the garage, and get through winter.

 

 

Synthetic Versus Conventional: Which Motor Oil is Best?

shutterstock_663998558539754847As the lubricant for the moving parts of your engine, motor oil is widely considered to be the most important fluid you can use. It prevents excessive engine wear and tear, which makes it vital to keep your car running. So when the time comes to get under the hood do an oil change, you can bet you’ll want to know whether to buy synthetic or conventional oil.

 

What You Need to Know
There are three main types of oil – conventional, synthetic and synthetic blend. Conventional oil is organic—it’s essentially refined crude oil that’s been pumped up from the ground. Synthetic oil is manufactured molecule by molecule, and because of that, synthetics have fewer imperfections in their chemical buildup than conventional does.

In general, synthetic oil outperforms conventional oil on all counts:

  • Synthetic oil works better in extreme temperatures from below freezing to above 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Conventional oil is highly reactive to temperatures.
  • Because synthetics have superior lubrication (they’re more slippery), they give you better fuel economy, performance, and even a longer engine life.
  • And best of all, synthetics don’t have to be changed as often. But make sure you meet warranty service mileage intervals regardless.

The only downside to synthetic oil is it costs more than the regular stuff. But before you choose pennies over performance, crunch the numbers—with longer oil change intervals, the price difference might be a wash.
Synthetic blends, or “semi-synthetics”, add synthetic additives to conventional oil and can be a nice compromise between the two. They’re less expensive but provide some of the performance enhancement you get from a synthetic.

These three types of motor oil will work fine in your vehicle as long as they meet current American Petroleum Institute (API) certification and don’t go against the manufacturer’s recommendations. The only type of engine you should never use synthetic oil in is a rotary. Rotary engines have unique seals that are engineered for use with conventional oil only.

Pro Tip: Check that you’re not voiding your warranty by using the wrong oil. Many newer vehicles require that you use synthetic oil and some synthetics aren’t approved for certain diesel engines.

 

The Final Say

When buying oil for your car, the best thing you can do is to follow your manufacturer’s recommendations. So, check that owner’s manual! When you consider that the wrong oil can cause an engine to fail, it pays to take their suggestions seriously. If you have the option to choose between synthetic and conventional and still aren’t sure which to pick, consult a pro—they’ll know what to do.

 

 

Crucial Cars: Dodge Challenger

2015 Dodge Challenger Hellcat

2015 Dodge Challenger Hellcat

From timeless icons to everyday essentials, Crucial Cars examines the vehicles we can’t live without.

For this installment, Gearhead’s Garage puts the spotlight on Dodge’s long-time rival to the Camaro and Mustang, the Challenger
Although Plymouth had slapped a huge fastback rear window onto its pedestrian Valiant and called it a Barracuda back in ’64, Ford is credited with starting the sporty four-passenger coupe/convertible segment a few weeks later with its much more unique Mustang, hence the “pony car” nickname for this then-new segment.

By 1970, the pony car segment was in full force. The Chevy Camaro and Pontiac Firebird came onto the scene for 1967, as did a redesigned Barracuda that broke away from its humble Valiant roots. AMC debuted its Javelin for 1968. And then Dodge finally joined the party for 1970 with its Challenger.

Big Bruiser
With its bigger size compared to its rivals (it was about four inches longer and five inches wider than a Mustang), the Challenger, available in coupe and convertible body styles, was a boulevard bruiser. Curiously, its redesigned-for-’70 Barracuda platform mate was about five inches shorter in length, making it more of a true pony car in terms of size. Still, there was no denying the appeal of the Challenger no matter how you wanted to classify it.

Mild to Wild
As with its competitors, the Dodge Challenger could be equipped with anything from a lackluster six cylinder engine to any of a number of pavement rippling V8s. Trim levels included the base Challenger, luxury-themed Challenger SE, high-performance R/T and road race track-focused T/A.

Engine choices ran the spectrum from a 225-cubic-inch slant six with just 145-horsepower and on through 318-, 340-, 383-, 426- and 440-cubic-inch V8s. Of them all, the most highly respected were the high-winding 340 4-barrel and “Six-Pack” (three two-barrel carbs), stout 440 4-barrel and Six-Pack and brutal 426 Hemi, (which boasted two four-barrel carbs). Their seriously underrated outputs stood at 275 hp, 290 hp, 375 hp, 390 hp and 425 hp, respectively.

Performance figures of the day had the Challenger T/A (which came with the 340 Six-Pack) sprinting to 60 mph in around 7.0 seconds and running the quarter mile in around 15.0, with the 440 Six Pack about a second quicker in each contest. A Hemi Challenger was king of the strip with the 0-to-60 dash done in about 5.8 seconds and the quarter mile done in the high 13s.

The following year, 1971, saw the T/A version and its 340 Six-Pack engine dropped from the lineup, but the 440 Six-Pack and the 426 Hemi were still available. This would be the last year for those big brutes. A split grille insert and separated rear taillights (versus the single unbroken strip of ’70) marked the minor styling update for that year’s Challenger.

As most muscle cars fans know, 1972 signaled the downfall of this performance era, and the Challenger was a victim as well. In addition to the convertible body style going away, so too did the big engine options, leaving just the slant six, 318 V8 and 340 V8. Furthermore, a drop in compression ratios as well as a change from SAE Gross to Net (engine running a full exhaust and accessories) ratings dropped output numbers.

Trim levels were also reduced that year to just two: the base Challenger and the sportier Rallye. As such, the hot ticket for ’72 was a Challenger Rallye with the 340 V8 and a four-speed stick. The 0-to-60 and quarter mile times for that version were still respectable at around 7.5- and 15.5-seconds, respectively. Styling changes included a much larger grille that continued below the bumper and a change to four semi-rectangular taillights.

For 1973 and 1974 (which would be this generation’s last year) the Challenger continued pretty much unchanged with the exception of a 360 cubic-inch V8 replacing the 340 for 1974 and the car receiving larger bumper guards to meet federal standards.

In Name Only
For 1978, the Challenger returned. No, actually just the name returned as that classic moniker was affixed to a Dodge-badged version of a Mitsubishi built sport coupe powered by – perish the thought — a four cylinder engine. Actually, one could choose between a 2.0-liter, 77 hp mill or a 2.6-liter 105 hp four banger. Electronic features and a plush velour interior highlighted this rival to the Toyota Celica and Datsun (Nissan) 200SX. For 1980, the big four became the standard engine while 1981 brought a more upright roofline. 1983 was the last year for this misnamed but pleasant enough small sport coupe.

The Real Challenger Returns
More than three decades after the original Challenger left the factory, its true successor returned. Specifically, 2008 saw the return of the Dodge Challenger, complete with a tribute to the 1970’s styling as well as a rip-roaring V8 engine. Though it may look very similar to a ’70-’74 Challenger, the new-age one is considerably larger. At around 4,150 pounds it tips the scales about 500 pounds heavier, and both wheelbase and overall length are around six inches greater. The positives are that the new Challenger has a lot more safety and luxury features, as well as considerably greater rear seat passenger room.

Indeed, only the ultra-high-performance “SRT8” version was available for 2008, complete with a 425-horsepower, 6.1-liter Hemi V8 engine matched to a five-speed automatic. Performance was stunning, as the Challenger SRT8 could leap to 60 in just 5.1 seconds and dismiss the quarter mile in 13.2 seconds, handily beating the legendary 426 Hemi Challenger of 1970. And unlike the old car, this one boasted fairly athletic handling around corners and could stop from 60 mph in just 115 feet.

The following year, a six-speed manual became available for the SRT8 and a base, V6-powered SE debuted, along with the return of the R/T, this time as a mid-level performance version packing a 5.7-liter, 370 hp Hemi V8.

For 2011, a new V6 engine sporting 305 hp debuted, meaning no apologies need be made for driving a “base” Challenger. Also, the SRT8 became the SRT8 392, the numbers signifying in cubic inches a larger V8 with 470 eager horses that can catapult this beast to 60 mph in just 4.5 seconds. Upgrades in suspension, steering and brakes across the lineup make this a very good year to consider if you’re in the market for a Challenger.

Essentially Unchallenged
Apart from minor equipment shuffling and some new trim levels, the Challenger continued through 2014 mostly unchanged. But 2015 brought some really big news. New styling paid tribute to, what else, the 1971 Challenger with its split grille (on all but the Hellcat version) and separated taillights. A new interior was a leap forward in terms of style and materials quality, while an eight-speed automatic joins the six-speed manual for transmission choices.

And now, forget 500, or even 600 horsepower. With the 2015 Challenger SRT Hellcat, an incredible 707 horsepower could be had under the scooped hood of a Challenger. Performance of this road burner was simply mind bending, with the dash to 60 mph a traction-dictated 4.1 second effort (with drag radials a 3-second time would likely be cake) and the quarter mile unreeled in just 11.9 seconds, making this one of the quickest street legal cars ever offered for sale to the general public.

Join the Club
If you’re a Challenger owner or even just an enthusiast, there are a few web sites you can check out for specs, classifieds and car show information. There are the Challenger Club of America, Dodge Challenger Forumz, and West Coast Challengers, to name a few.

Bigger isn’t Always Better

Wheels: Bigger isn’t Always Better
by Street Talk


Seems that “Bigger is better” has become something of an American mantra. We’ve got Big Macs, big sunglasses, big houses, big trucks. And in the automotive modification world, big wheels. The latter have grown from simply big to downright cartoonish in some cases, giving some rides the look of rolling caricatures.

On the other hand, there are big wheels that do more than add automotive eye candy. With improved performance as the goal, these wheels, when shod with high-performance tires, are essentially the athletic shoes of the automotive aftermarket.

Yet despite how cool bigger than stock wheels may look, depending on where your priorities lie, they may not be the best choice for your car.

Bigger For More Bling
The first custom wheels to start the big wheel movement were “Dubs”, which is urban slang for the number 20. Measuring 20 inches in diameter, these large wheels were favored among pro athletes, rappers and other celebrity types who wanted their rides to draw even more attention. Some even had separate center pieces that would spin freely, further upping the “look at me” factor when the car stopped and the wheels seemingly kept spinning.

Originally seen fitted to big luxury cars, such as Cadillacs, S-Class Benzes, 6- and 7 Series BMWs and various Bentleys, Dubs soon appeared on exotic sports cars too. Eventually, as the wheel choices expanded and got more affordable, non-wealthy folks got into the act, putting them onto more mainstream cars and trucks, such as Chevy Camaros, Olds Cutlasses, Chevy Caprices, Chevy Tahoes, Ford Expeditions and Ford Crown Victorias. The car makers themselves started offering big wheel options as well.

More recent years have seen these styling statement wheels grow much larger, with 24-inch and even larger aftermarket hoops being squeezed into fenders originally designed for 15-, 16-, or 17-inch factory wheels. Although they’re larger than 20s, these wheels are still called Dubs by most people. Indeed, a magazine dubbed “Dub” sprang up back in 2000 to celebrate the big wheel culture. And it’s still going strong today, some 16 years later.

Typically chromed and sporting fancy designs, Dubs were (and are) typically much heavier than the original wheels which came on a given car. That’s not a good thing as it negatively affects the car’s overall performance and ride characteristics. Due to their greater mass, they take more power to overcome what’s called rotational inertia. In other words, because they’re heavier, it takes more power to get them rolling. Conversely, once they’re up to speed, it takes longer to slow them down. So both acceleration and braking are affected.

Similarly, their heavier weight makes them slower to react to quick up-and-down motions of the suspension. Factor in the super low profile tires they’re wearing, whose minuscule, stiff sidewalls offer virtually no impact absorption, and you’re left with a notably harsher ride than what the car originally provided.

Bigger Wheels for Performance Enhancement
On the other end of the big wheel spectrum are the performance wheels that are typically available in “Plus-1, Plus-2, Plus-3” etcetera fitments, which indicate how much larger (in inches) than the stock wheel they are. These larger wheels are constructed of ultra-lightweight materials such as exotic alloys or even carbon fiber, so they actually end up weighing less than the smaller, factory-issued wheels.

As such, these high-performance wheels don’t saddle your ride with any of the ill effects that heavier wheels impart on a car’s dynamics. Instead, this type of a big wheel upgrade provides notably crisper handling and sharper steering response. Less mass also helps improve acceleration and braking qualities.

Yes, going with these larger yet lighter wheels still means that, even without suspension mods, the ride is going to be somewhat stiffer than stock due to those shorter, stiffer tire sidewalls. So those who are happy with their car’s factory-issued handling and ride balance may want to reconsider this type of upsizing upgrade, while those enthusiasts looking for sharper, more “connected-to-the-road” handling will likely feel it’s a more than fair trade-off.