Crucial Cars: Winnebago Motorhome

Winnebago motor home 1From timeless icons to everyday essentials, Crucial Cars examines the vehicles we can’t live without.

In this installment, our man Gearhead pays tribute to an icon that’s revered in the RV sector: the Winnebago Motorhome.

Along with the warm weather, summertime brings a variety of killer road trip options. There’s everything from cruising the boulevard in a classic muscle machine, to unraveling a twisty road in an athletic sports car, to reaching that remote camping or kayaking spot via a rugged 4WD rig. And let’s not forget seeing the sights of America in a mobile condominium. The latter is more commonly referred to as an RV (Recreational Vehicle). Or, to use old-school parlance, a motorhome.

Like Apple and Nike, certain brands have a way of earning iconic status. And within the realm of motorhomes, so it is with Winnebago. Based in Iowa and debuting in 1958 as a maker of travel trailers, Winnebago started producing motorhomes in 1966. Thanks to its very efficient production methods, including an assembly line (unusual in this business), Winnebago was able to sell its motorhomes at much lower prices than its rivals. One doesn’t need an MBA to know that high quality and low pricing makes for a pretty sound business model. As a result, Winnebago quickly became the number one-selling name in motorhomes.Winnebago 1973 advertisement

Winnebagos, both old and new, remain very popular. As such, there are a number of enthusiast sites for them (which include their essentially identical Itasca sister brand). They include the WIT Club, this Winnebago Owners Forum and the nostalgic My Winnebago Story site.

Taking It With You As You Get Away From It All
For some folks, “camping out” doesn’t necessarily equate to “roughing it.” Indeed, with the swankier “Class A” (those motorhomes that resemble a rock star’s tour bus) models offered by Winnebago, luxuries such as a washer and dryer, retracting big screen TVs and even an electric fireplace are offered. These units typically also feature “slide-outs.” These sections of the motorhome slide out to increase the living space inside once you’ve arrived at your destination. Go all Will Smith and you can spend up to a half mill on the plushest and roomiest rig Winnebago offers, the Grand Tour diesel.

Still, Winnebago hasn’t forgotten those who don’t play sports or make movies for a living and so the company also offers more affordable options. The latter include the popular and well-equipped “Minnie Winnie” that starts at around $65,000. This is a Class C motorhome, the kind that has the front end (or “cab”) of a full-size van coupled to the living quarters behind.

Bring On The Brave
But what really made Winnebago as recognizable a brand name as Kleenex was the “Brave” model. Debuting in 1967, the Pug-nosed Brave sported an “eyebrow” of sorts that jutted out above the windshield and also featured a flying “W” down the motorhome’s ides. Those styling features made it easy to identify the iconic Brave, whether it was sitting at a campsite or sailing down the freeway, and they lasted for over 10 years during this model’s initial production run.
Winnie reintroduced the Brave for 2015, offering a modern interpretation of this classic. Paying tribute to the original Brave with its familiar silhouette and flying “W”, the new Brave is offered in 1960s song-inspired color schemes such as “Mellow Yellow,” “Crimson ‘n Clover” and “Aquarius.” MotorHome magazine checked out the new Brave and thought it was rather “groovy.”

A Brave With Serious Bravado
Presenting an awesome answer to a question nobody should ever ask, Ringbrothers revitalized a very tired 1972 Winnie Brave they bought at an auction. The Ring brothers are a couple of serious car guys who, along with their skilled crew, are known for turning out some of the finest resto-mod builds on the planet.

As this Boldride article shows, this Brave’s body was left pretty much alone while the interior received a mashup makeover that combined, of all things, World War II airplane and Tiki hut bar themes. The Brave sorely needed a new engine, so out came the Mopar 318 and in went a supercharged LS-series V8, cranking out about 900 hp. The brothers claim that their “Ringabago” can sprint to 60 mph in less than four seconds. If the idea of an old motorhome easily lighting them up and being capable of blowing the doors off a Ferrari F40 or Hemi Cuda doesn’t make you laugh, then probably nothing will.

Have You Ever Seen Anything as Absurd as This?

On the vehicular shock value meter, this “way out there” Winnie easily pegs the needle. Have you seen or heard about anything as crazy yet cool as this? If so, send us your brief comments on the beast.

Before you hit the road this summer, hit up Advance Auto Parts for all the best in savings and selection. Buy online, pick up in-store in 30 minutes.