Top 5 DIY Projects to Tackle Yourself

father_son_work_under_hoodWhen minor things go wrong with our cars, most of us just bite the bullet and consult a trusted mechanic. But have you ever considered that you might be selling yourself short? Fact is, if you’ve got a little patience, you can resolve a lot of these issues without even leaving home. And that means extra money in your pocket, not to mention the satisfaction of a job well done.

In this post, I want to share a few common DIY (“Do It Yourself”) procedures with you. Remember, even if you did every single one of these jobs, you’d still only be scratching the surface of your potential. There isn’t much about a car that you can’t fix on your own. But sometimes, the hardest part is just getting started. Read on for some simple ways to get that DIY ball rolling.

1. Headlight Restoration

If your car’s more than a few years old, chances are its headlight lenses could use some TLC – particularly if you deal with inclement weather on a regular basis. You’ll notice cloudiness on the plastic lens surface and maybe some yellowing as well. Fortunately, a number of reputable brands sell headlight restoration kits that can make those lenses look new again. I’m always a fan of Meguiar’s products, and some of my neighborhood friends have responded well to the 3M kits, too.

Don’t get intimidated if your kit requires a power drill, by the way; that’s just because you need more power to get that crud off than a human arm can muster. In my experience, the job may take an hour or two to do properly, but there’s nothing tricky about it.

2. Headlight Replacement

Mechanics love when customers come in with blown-out headlights. I’m telling you, folks, repair jobs under the hood don’t get much simpler than this one; it’s like giving that friendly mechanic a free lunch. There are tons of replacement headlights and headlight bulbs for sale right here on Advance Auto Parts, and we’ve even got some handy step-by-step tutorials to help you along the way. Be sure to check your owner’s manual, too, as there’s often a How-To in there for the headlight replacement procedure.

A word of advice, though, and this goes for any job that involves disassembly or removal: remember the order in which you take things apart. If you have to remove your headlight assembly, for example, you may end up unscrewing and pulling out a number of pieces. Please don’t forget how to put everything back together.

3. Replace Your Wipers

This is actually a simpler job than headlight replacement, because you don’t even have to pop the hood. Windshield-wiper blades typically just snap into place, so replacing them is as easy as flipping the wiper shafts up off the windshield, popping the old blades off and snapping the new ones on. Your owner’s manual should have specific information about the removal and replacement process.

As for your blade selection, it depends on several different factors–the kind of car you have, where you live and the type of driving you do. You can learn more at this informational page on windshield wiper installation.

4. Replenish Your Fluids

Fluids are the lifeblood of an internal combustion engine. Without enough motor oil, the engine will wear down more quickly and may even seize. Without enough power steering fluid, the pump, bearings and other parts are in imminent danger. Without enough brake fluid…well, you get the point. Bottom line, it’s crucial to make sure that all fluids are always up to spec. To do it yourself, just check your owner’s manual for the location of each fluid reservoir or dipstick, and make a habit of inspecting those fluid levels. I do it every other time I get gas. If you need replacement fluids, the Advance Auto Parts website has got every imaginable variety; just plug what you’re looking for into the search field.

5. Wash & Wax Your Ride

Ever find yourself shaking your head at the price of a car wash? I’ll tell you one thing: it definitely costs more than you’d pay to do it yourself. So why not get up close and personal with your car’s finish? My favorite product is called “waterless car wash,” because you don’t need water or a bucket or anything like that — just grab a microfiber cloth and a bottle of Griot’s finest, and 15 minutes later your car will be shining like it just came from the detailer. Of course, if you want to get more serious with waxing, clay-bar treatments and so forth, there’s a whole world of at-home detailing products to explore.

“Wait, why should I DIY again?”

Let’s recap. When you do simple jobs like these yourselves, you definitely save money, and you’ll also know your car’s being treated with the love it deserves. Plus, you’re gonna learn a thing or two along the way. What’s not to like?

By the way, give me a shout in the comments if you try any of these DIYs, or if you have any other suggestions for all the aspiring driveway mechanics out there.

Editor’s note: Check out the Advance Auto Parts YouTube Channel for more great DIY project tips.