The Tantalizing New Shelby Mustang Terlingua

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Shelby Mustang Terlingua

What does Terlingua mean?
It’s pretty much common knowledge that Carroll Shelby was a fun-loving son-of-a-gun. Back in the 1960s, when he fielded a racing team with his buddies Bill Neale and Jerry Titus, Shelby and his Mustang mates would unwind at a large ranch in Terlingua, Texas. Hunting, riding dirt bikes and general hell-raising were the “R and R” activities of choice for these merrymaking men.

Jackrabbits were a common sight around the 200,000-acre ranch and gave rise to a mascot designed by Bill Neale for the racing team. And so the Jackrabbit logo, seemingly in a “Stop right there—you really don’t think you can beat us, do you?” pose, was born.

What’s a Shelby Mustang Terlingua?
In short, the Terlingua is the most track-focused Shelby Mustang you can get, that also pays tribute to that great 1960s racing team which won the 1967 Trans-Am championship. Sporting the iconic Jackrabbit on its fenders, the modern Terlingua is dressed in the black and yellow color scheme that the team primarily used back in the days when Sergeant Pepper and Pet Sounds were climbing the Billboard charts.

Shelby Mustang Terlingua Racing Team

Nostalgia aside, this ‘stang is chock-full of the latest race goodies. There are carbon fiber components aplenty, such as the hood, front splitter, rocker panels, rear spoiler, and rear diffuser.

Under that vented hood sits a supercharged, 5.0-liter V8, shared with the Shelby Super Snake Mustang, which sends “over 750 horsepower” to the pavement via either a six-speed manual or six-speed automatic transmission. Suspension tweaks include adjustable Eibach coil-overs, camber/caster plates, and lightweight 20-inch Weld wheels. Stopping power is adequately fortified with 6-piston front/4-piston rear Brembo brakes.

Shelby Mustang Terlingua
Interior highlights include added gauges for boost and oil pressure, unique headrests, and a plaque signed by Shelby, Neile, and Titus. Racing seats are optional.

Under that vented hood sits a supercharged, 5.0-liter V8, shared with the Shelby Super Snake Mustang, which sends “over 750 horsepower” to the pavement.

Track time
We put the Terlingua through its paces at Spring Mountain Ranch race track, which is about 60 miles west of Las Vegas. For comparison purposes (and to show off the rest of their fun-loving Mustang lineup), the Shelby folks also had a couple of Super Snake Mustangs on hand, on which the Terlingua is based, as well as a Shelby GT Mustang EcoBoost. Keep in mind these are all ultra-high performance versions of Ford’s already capable Mustang, with plenty of power underfoot and sharpened-up handling to go with it. And yet the Terlingua quickly showed itself to be the top track jock of the group.

Once we were comfortable with the circuit, the pace quickened, and we found that the Terlingua was very well-planted and confident when being caned around the track. The well-weighted, communicative steering and buttoned-down suspension allowed us to consistently pick off apexes with surgical precision. Even when running through a slight rise and dip in the track while approaching one of the first turns, this Shelby didn’t wiggle or waver off line.

Blasting out of the corners and down the straights in this well-behaved beast was effortless, thanks to the linear delivery of the tidal-wave of thrust on tap. Those brawny Brembos chipped in as well, allowing us to brake late and hard, time and again with no fade, as we dove aggressively into the turns.

Shelby Mustang Terlingua
Want one?
With a production run of just 75 total cars, of which 50 are slated for the U.S., the Shelby Terlingua Mustang will be a rare sight indeed. Pricing starts at $65,999, but that’s on top of the cost of a new 2015/2016 Mustang GT, meaning you’re at about $100 grand minimum.

For those lucky few who pony up (sorry) for a Mustang that can go head to head on a road course with European thoroughbreds that are three times the price, we salute you. The rest of us will be watching videos of your epic track days on YouTube.

Movies, motors and McQueen (Steve McQueen, that is)

Steve McQueenBetween all the multi-tasking that my husband and I do — you know, those responsibilities and obligations to our jobs, our kids, our families, our pets, our activities, our home and our vehicles — there is actually one thing that does remove the sting from the whole too-much-going-on-at-the-same-time dilemma. What is it? Making time to take in a movie. Or two when time luxuriously allows.

It’s a commitment. And one we’d never trade in for the world. It’s a simple way to carve out time together, just us two.

The latest movie titles embarrassingly escape us, and it’s no use trying to remember the numerous TV commercials for the latest crop of movies. So we head online to see what’s playing locally. Out of the handful that we barely recognize, the lone standout falls into the car movies category. I think you know the one: where today’s generation of fast and famous film cars share top billing alongside current Hollywood heavies (all of whom surely must derive some form or level of inspiration from Steve McQueen.) Fast cars, all furiously zooming around, driven by hot actors and pretty actresses, all engaging in tons of car-racing action and adrenaline-pumping rescues, fueled by a nonstop thumping soundtrack . . . and a heavy sigh from me and the hubby.

Not necessarily our style of film, but it’s how we now quell the craving for car movies. Truthfully, our style leans more toward the car movies (and their famous film cars which are now icons) from decades ago. Give us those car movies with Steve McQueen tearing around the streets of San Francisco, or Gene Hackman using the streets of New York as a high-speed obstacle course for four wheels, or, heck, even Lightning McQueen re-paving the streets of Radiator Springs for that matter, and we’ll be there with our bucket of popcorn in hand. Certain car movies are the greatest!

Famous film cars themselves will always have our attention, too. Surely, you can picture them as well. In the cool department, there’s no mistaking that 1968 moss-green 390 V8 Ford Mustang GT that has Steve McQueen written all over it. In the campy department, nothing can take the place of that late-1950s Cadillac stretch ambulance conversion that was vital in helping keep ghosts and their slimy green ectoplasm in check. And who says famous film cars have to be limited to cars? With another nod to Steve McQueen, there’s no forgetting the TT Special 650 Triumph motorcycle he used in that classic WWII escape scene.Steve McQueen

What about you? Which car movies starring your favorite and famous film cars rank as your go-to choices? Maybe it was that first R-rated movie you saw. Or that memorable drive-in movie that truly had you engrossed in what was happening on screen. There’s a story behind them all. Whether it involved Steve McQueen or any of those famous film cars, share it! Start confessing in our Comments section down below.

 

Editor’s note: As you pine for Steve McQueen and the classic car films of yore, visit Advance Auto Parts for to maintain a cinema-quality car of your own. Mustang photo courtesy of The Mustang Source.