Tuxlee Shares His Oil Change Tips

oil change tips

Hey, Tuxlee here. I’ve traveled to tons of Advance stores and automotive events, and one thing people always ask me about is changing their own oil. (My parents say I’ve done so many oil changes since I was a puppy that it turned my fur jet black—it’s a small badge of honor to me actually). I also hang out with some pretty knowledgeable people, and I’ve picked up a few tips over the years that will make your next DIY oil change a breeze, whether it’s your first time or if you’re on your 70th bottle.

My first tip is to buy a good pair of latex or nitrile gloves to keep your paws hands nice and clean. With the oil type, you have a few options on whether to go conventional, synthetic blend, or full synthetic (there’s also high mileage varations). I suggest you first stick with your car’s recommended oil viscosity—this is usually printed on your engine’s oil cap, or if not then in your owner’s manual—and then go from there. Conventional oil gets the job done, but synthetic oil lasts longer and performs better under heat and cold. I like both types, so you can read more about it here to see what works better for you.

Oil Change Tools and Supplies

Alright, you have your oil. You’ll need a few other supplies, all of which are sold at your local Advance store. P.S. You can get awesome deals on oil filters when you buy one of our oil change specials!

While you’re in the store, grab a free reminder decal to record the date and mileage of your next expected oil change. Or write it down in your car maintenance journal like I do.

•Oil filter
(Regular filters go with conventional oil, heavier duty filters pair better with synthetic oil)

•Oil filter wrench
(Some can get by using their hands or an old belt, but this is good to have)

•Oil drain plug gasket or crush washer
(Keeps leaky drips away)

•Oil drain pan
(So your oil doesn’t end up all over the driveway)

•Wrench for drain plug
(Look in your owner’s manual to find the size you need)

•Funnel
(For a smooth, no-mess pour. Trust me you’re going to need this)

•Rags
(To wipe off old oil and keep things neat)

•Safety glasses
(I don’t like barking out orders, but safety first!)

•Gloves
(Unless you want to look like a black Yorkipoo)

Oil Change Steps

Now you’re ready to give your car some tender love and oil!

1. Securely raise your vehicle on ramps or jack-stands (use a jack lift for the latter). Makes sure to put blocks behind your tires. If you can safely get under your vehicle without needing to raise it, then go for it.

oil change tips2. Warm up the engine for a couple minutes to get the oil warm (but not too long or the oil will be hot). Raise your hood and open the oil cap on top of your engine to let the old oil drain faster.

3. Get under the car and position your drain pan under the oil plug (account for the initial stream of oil shooting out further than directly under the plug).

4. Using your wrench, loosen the plug a few turns. Then finish loosening the plug with your hand, quickly pulling it away when the oil is starting to drain out. Be careful of hot motor oil (gloves help in this case).

5. Wipe the drain plug while the oil drains and inspect it for bent or broken threads. Replace the sealing washer if cracked or worn, or use a new metal crush washer if needed.

6. After the oil has drained (give it 10-30 minutes for a good drain if you have the time), wipe away oil residue from the oil pan and put the drain plug back in. Tighten it firmly, but don’t overdo it. Your owner’s manual will have the exact torque required.

Do me (and other animals) a favor, clean up oil leaks and don’t dispose of oil in your yard, streams, or waste-water drains. Your favorite Advance store will safely dispose of your used oil for free! Available at most of our 3,500 stores (unless prohibited by law).

7. Reposition your drain pan by the oil filter and remove it using your oil filter wrench (or hand if it will budge). Some wrenches work from the end, while others wrap around the filter.

8. If your filter still won’t budge, puncture it with a screwdriver at its lowest point to drain, then use the same screwdriver to spin off the filter. A little more oil will come out when you spin off the filter, so have your rags handy.

9. Apply a film of clean oil to the top of the new filter gasket. Then spin the filter on using only your hand. Go ¾ of a turn after you feel the gasket make contact with the engine after spinning it on.

oil change tips10. Double check the filter and drain plug for tightness, then fill your engine with the recommended viscosity and amount of motor oil. (Again, your owner’s manual will provide this).

11. Determine your oil level using the dipstick, then check for any leaks. Start the engine and check for leaks again. Bring used motor oils to Advance for proper disposal or recycling.

Well, that’s a wrap. You can now safely do your own oil change or you learned some tips. Who said you can’t teach an old dog new tricks?!

Find satisfaction in knowing you’re taking good care of your car. Your car will be sure to return the favor! For more oil change tips and a helpful video, click here

Three Good Reasons to Change Your Own Oil

Life is busy. So you’ll be forgiven for thinking that a discussion about changing your own motor oil seems about as appealing as a lecture from your dentist about flossing more regularly. Why should you take precious time, a limited resource, and spend it changing your own oil? Here are three reasons.

motor oil

1. It’s cheaper

Money is a precious resource for many of us. So, it’s enticing to know that changing your own oil saves you green. Typical cars require four to five quarts of motor oil. You’ll also need a new oil filter to finish the job. Guess how much these items cost at an auto parts store. $40? $50? Good news—you can get out the door for around $20-30 bucks, especially if you take advantage of the regular oil change specials. Cheaper than you thought, right?

Now, you may see a $19.99 oil change advertised at the local quick-lube station, but there are a few problems with that.

  1. First, they tend to use generic, one-size-fits-all motor oil that may not be the best quality. One of the great things about DIY is that you get to buy whatever kind of oil you want.
  2. Second, that cheap oil change and convenience comes at a cost—the hard-sell on all sorts of other services that may be a waste of your money and time.
  3. Third, no one cares about your car more than you do. You’ll do a great job because it matters to you.

In short, you’ll save money changing your own oil and gain peace of mind.

 

Check out oil change specials for deals on the oil and oil filter to save some cash.

2. It’s easier—and faster—than you think

You can change your own oil using a few basic tools. We can help you choose the best oil for your vehicle and even recycle your used oil. As for time—how much time do you already spend waiting in a crowded lobby for someone else to change your oil? With a little experience, you’ll be able to change your own oil in far less time, without ever leaving home.

3. It helps you avoid larger repairs

Changing your own oil can be just the beginning. While you’re changing your oil and filter, for example, it’s also easy to check the drive and accessory belts, air filter, and spark plugs. That way you can catch simple maintenance issues before they become major repairs or problems. DIYing can be addictive, in the best way. So give the oil change a shot, feel pride in your knowledge, and see if the experience turns into a bridge to more exciting projects down the line.

Have you changed your own oil? Do you have tips to share for making it an even easier project? Share your experience with new DIYers.

The importance of Engine Oil: the sweet fluid that keeps your car running smoothly

I work a lot of long hours. I start early and often finish late, and as anyone around me (particularly my wife) knows, I drink a lot of coffee. It’s the sweet black elixir that keeps me going and helps me through the day.

image of engine oil

Speaking of precious elixirs (You were waiting for that, weren’t you?), engine oil—commonly known as motor oil—is the same thing for cars. Your car’s engine is a series of complicated, hot, fast-moving parts, and engine oil is what keeps all those parts lubricated and running smoothly. As the parts heat up, so does the oil, so it’s very important to have the right type of motor oil, in the right amount, and keep it changed regularly.

The bottom line is, pay attention to the specifications in your owner’s manual and you’ll be happier than my wife during a sale at Macy’s. Buy the correct type of engine oil, in the correct weight. Some manufacturers specifically recommend synthetic motor oil, and if you use a different kind, it could void your warranty. Weight has to do with the temperatures in which you run your car (winter or summer) and also how thick the oil becomes when heated. Bear in mind that you don’t want it too thick when it’s cold or too thin when the engine heats up. This is particularly important in new cars, where the tolerances (gaps between moving parts) can be extremely thin, so you want to make sure the oil isn’t thicker than recommended.

If you’re committed to a lot of do-it-yourself jobs, changing your own engine oil is very easy and relatively painless (although it can get really messy) but even if your mechanic changes your engine oil as a part of your regular service, it’s never a bad idea to keep a quart in your car and do a quick check of your oil levels when you fill your tank up…just be careful, as your engine gets VERY hot and its really best to check oil when the engine is cooler. So make gassing up and checking oil your first stop.

Just make sure the motor oil quart has certification on it from whatever your manual recommends: likely the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) and preferably the API (American Petroleum Institute). They regulate and make sure the oil is of good quality and thickness.

The bottom line is, your car needs engine oil the way you need water (or I need coffee). It’s very easy to keep an eye on the engine oil and change it regularly for many years of happy, reliable engine life. Happy motoring.

 

Editor’s Note: Advance Auto Parts can assist you in finding the optimal engine oil, plus all of the right tools such as jacks, oil drain pans, gloves and more—to ensure the job goes smoothly. On top of that, Advance Auto Parts also recycles used motor oil.  So after you perform an oil change, bring your used oil back to the store for clean and easy recycling.